Work Around the World

42 Ways You Can Make Money and Travel the World

Derek Popular, Travel Tips & Advice, Work & Travel 401 Comments

Work Around the World
Have you ever asked yourself, “How will I possibly make money while traveling?” or “How will I survive on the road?” or maybe “How can I can’t start traveling when I don’t have much money?”.

Chances are that these very thoughts have indeed crossed your mind (they cross all of our minds at some point!) and there’s also a chance that you haven’t found any answers. As a result, you’ve still yet to take that first step and start traveling and as time passes by, you start to wonder if you’ll ever achieve your travel goals.

Here on the blog I’m always making the claim that you can make money and travel much more easily than most people think. But yesterday I realized that I should probably back up that claim with some actual examples. So, that’s what I want to do here. I want to help you answer those questions above.

Are you ready? Here’s a list of 42 ways you can make money while traveling (keep in mind this is just a fraction of the opportunities that actually exist!)…

Teach English – Job opportunities are all around the world and in many cases, you don’t need to be certified. You just need to be a native speaker. Check out eslcafe.com, send in a few applications to schools in South Korea, Japan, Thailand or dozens of other locations & you’ll be surprised at how many interviews you land.

Sell Timeshares – If you were born to be a salesperson, then head to Greece, Thailand, Mexico, the Caribbean or any other major resort area and you can find work selling timeshares. These resorts want salespeople who can relate to their potential customers, so they prefer to have Americans selling to Americans, Italians selling to Italians and so on. The earning potential is huge in this line of work.

Resort Jobs – If selling isn’t your thing, resorts all over the planet often hire staff from other countries for a variety of positions, such as front desk, restaurant or the activity/entertainment department.

Work in a Hostel – Hostels are often looking for new staff who are willing to work some hours each day, either at reception or cleaning or maybe both, in exchange for a free bed each night. Not a bad way to save money at all.

Online Freelance Work – Whether you have a background or interest in web design, programming, illustration, writing, marketing, consulting, legal work, engineering or able to do any type of admin work, you should definitely look at websites such as Elance.com and Odesk.com. These are platforms that connect freelancers with people and companies who need work done. Even if your background is in something else, have a look anyway as there is freelance work to be found in dozens of different fields.

Act in Films & Television Overseas – Head to Mumbai, stand on a street corner in the Colaba neighborhood and before long, an industry scout will ask you if you want to act in a Bollywood film. (I once acted in an Indian daytime drama!) You won’t make millions, but you’ll be on the big screen. I also know people who have done the same in Kenya and earned very good money.

Working Holiday Visas – Countries such as Australia, New Zealand, Canada, France, Ireland and Singapore offer these to foreigners, generally those who are between the ages of 18 – 30. If you’re in that age range, the working holiday visa might just be your best option to make money and travel. It allows you stay in a country for up to one year and in some cases, to apply for and work in any position you want. Yes, it is a sweet deal and one incredible way to earn an income while being overseas.

Fruit-Picking – Get out into the sun, grab a basket and start picking fruit. Such an option is quite common for travelers/backpackers passing through Australia and the pay can include payment per kilo of fruit you pick, room, board or any combination of the three.

Travel Blogging – It’s not easy to earn a big income with a travel blog. The amount of time/effort required to do so is much more than most people imagine. But if you’re looking for some extra cash to help fund part of your travels, while keeping the world informed of your adventures, starting a travel blog might be your answer. (Have a look at the high quality, extremely useful Superstar Blogging Course by Nomadic Matt if you’re serious about earning money from your blog.)

Work Online

Any Kind of Blogging – You don’t have to start a travel blog just because you’re traveling. Whatever your interest may be, that might be the kind of blog you should start. There are always opportunities to earn some money no matter what you choose to focus on.

Affiliate Marketing – Making money this way is definitely possible even though the competition can be high. But if you’re willing to dedicate yourself to a couple of months worth of research, you’ll find your niche and hopefully a steady paycheck. If you don’t know much about affiliate marketing, have a look at Affilorama.com, which offers an excellent series of free lessons to get you started.

Selling Goods Online – Found some cool product that you think others would be interested in? Have your own handmade product you want to sell? You could set up a website or a shop on eBay or any other type of online sales outlet and start selling. Your success will depend on many factors but again, if you’re willing to learn how to get your goods in front of the right people online, even a few sales each week could potentially keep you on the road.

Day-Trading – It may not be for everyone, but there are people out there earning a living and traveling as a result of their day trading efforts. One in particular is Marcello from WanderingTrader.com.

Housesitting – Who wouldn’t want a free place to stay? While you typically won’t get paid, if you don’t mind looking after somebody else’s house while they’re away, this is a great option. I know many people who just hop around from house-sitting gig to house-sitting gig, essentially avoiding accommodation expenses for years. Gigs can be one week, one month, one year or anything in between. (Jess & Dani from GlobetrotterGirls.com and Pete & Dalene from HeckticTravels.com are the experts when it comes to house-sitting!)

Work Remotely – There’s no rule that states you must quit your current job in order to travel. Perhaps your position allows you to work remotely and all you need to do is speak with your boss in order to make the adjustment. Head down to a place like Playa del Carmen, Mexico and you’ll find foreigners everywhere who are doing just this, able to make money and travel wherever they wish.

Haircuts – Choose a popular hostel, put up a sign (ask first!), charge a reasonable amount and off you go. I remember meeting a traveler who was doing this in Zagreb, Croatia and she was making $40 USD per day by advertising in 3 hostels. She would cut hair for a month, then travel for a month and repeat. Not bad at all.

Massages – Follow the same idea as above but offer massages instead! I’d sign up for sure after a long day wandering around a town or city.

Bartending – There are bars in many towns and cities that pay ‘cash in hand’ to travelers who can work a bar and are willing to stay in one spot for a while. Bars connected to hostels are often your best bet.

Cafe/Restaurant Work – The same goes for cafes and restaurants. If you’re in a popular backpacking destination, just ask the hostel staff if they know of any cafes that hire travelers. Sometimes you’ll find a local classifieds/coupon traveler-oriented magazine lying around the hostel as well. Flip it open and many times you’ll find restaurants advertising for help.

Website Design – Know how to build simple websites, or even more complex ones? Start your own business and look for clients online, through family & friends or even overseas. Staying at a hostel in Turkey that has a crappy website? Tell them you’ll completely improve their site for $50. (When I was traveling in Syria, just because I worked online, I received over a dozen offers from budget hotels, restaurants and other tourism-related businesses who were willing to pay me up to $500 USD to set up a new website for them. And this can be done anywhere.)

Teach Musical Instruments – Piano? Guitar? Flute? Glockenspiel? Whatever you can play, chances are there are people all over the world who want to learn as well. Advertise in local online classifieds or put up signs in busy areas, such as gathering places of college students, and you just might have a few classes lined up before you know it.

Teach Any Language – English isn’t the only language people want to learn. Speak French, Spanish, German, Italian, Mandarin, Arabic or anything else? Look for jobs or set up your own classes by advertising at universities or popular hangouts such as cafes.

Teach Dance Classes – Again, put up some signs around town, find space in a public park and teach others how to get their tango on. You could also work out a deal with a restaurant/bar where they pay you to hold a class at their location because it will bring them plenty of extra business.

Dance Around the World

Teach Yoga – You could do the exact same thing as above with yoga or any form of exercise!

Construction Work – If you have construction experience, or you can fake it, this is one industry that tends to hire people for short-term work while paying them ‘under the table’. As a result, this makes for a great option for travelers looking to earn some quick cash.

Au Pair – The situations vary but you’ll get room, board and a weekly paycheck for helping take care of a family’s kids, allowing you to explore the country you end up in during your free time as well.

Surfing Instructor – I’d be fired as a surfing instructor in two minutes right now (here’s the video proof), but even after I had practiced for a couple of weeks during a stay in Mexico back in 2008, I was offered a job teaching beginners. You don’t need to be an expert to land a job, you just need to be better than those who have never tried surfing before!

Scuba Diving Instructor – Are you certified? If so, there are dozens of great scuba destinations around the world – Egypt, Mexico, Thailand, Australia, Hawaii – where you could find work. Talon from 1Dad1Kid.com has done just this in Central America.

Tour Escort – Many international tour operators, especially those such as Indochina.com that offer budget tours around the world, hire tour escorts to accompany each group. The pay is on the low side and you usually must sign up for a 1-2 year contract, but the benefit is that you get to explore parts of the world without spending any money at all, while gaining some great work experience in the process.

Sell Your Art & Crafts at Local Markets – There are markets in many places where foreigners can rent a stall and sell their goods. Usually these are markets that are geared towards tourists and other travelers. As a result, there are many people who follow the market circuit, bouncing around from market to market all year round, selling their hand made crafts, artwork, clothes from India or other goods that are in high-demand.

Tour Operators in the Caribbean – When I worked on board cruise ships and we would dock in places such as St. Thomas or St. Maarten or Cozumel, many of the staff working for our local tour operators were from the USA, Canada and Europe. Their job was to greet the passengers coming off the ship, keep the groups organized and lead them to their tour bus or van or boat. The pay was okay and they got to live and work in a tropical location for a while.

Photography – I’m an average photographer at best but for those who know what they’re doing with a camera, it is possible to try and sell the travel photos you take. You could set up your own ‘shop’ on sites such as SmugMug.com and you could try and sell your photos to a variety of travel magazines and to companies that have stock photography collections.

Travel Writing – If you’re a decent writer, there are opportunities out there to write about your experiences and the destinations you visit and then have those articles published on websites or online magazines. It’s not an easy business, but if you can get a couple of articles published and start to establish yourself, your articles might soon become sought after.

Corporate World – Maybe you want to live overseas but you want to have a proper career or are looking for a higher paycheck. Well, there’s nothing stopping you from applying for corporate or other long-term jobs around the world. China has a growing number of opportunities for foreigners, Singapore and New Zealand are very popular and several countries in the Middle East are home to thousands of expats living and working for companies there.

Cruise Ship Employment – I always recommend this option as an excellent way to earn good money while getting a taste of the world, gaining some solid work experience and networking with hundreds of people (both fellow crew and passengers) from around the world. Not a bad list of benefits. If you’re interested, you might want to look at my popular eBook – How to Work on Cruise Ships.

Cruise Ship Employment

Work on a Yacht – Sometimes they pay, sometimes they don’t, but if you look at websites such as DesperateSailors.com, you might find it hard to turn down an offer to work on board a yacht or sailboat, especially one that will spend a few months in the Caribbean or Mediterranean or perhaps even head across the Pacific.

Travel/Tourism Industry – This won’t ensure that you’re on the road all the time, but a job in the travel industry at home might be perfect for some. A steady paycheck, plenty of good networking possibilities and if you end up in the right position, you’ll just have to travel as part of your work. (Work in Travel is a great resource for anyone interested in working in this industry.)

Edit English Signs/Menus – It might sound silly but there are travelers out there earning decent money by wandering around touristy areas all over the world and getting paid to correct the English spelling/grammar on signs and menus of businesses that try to attract foreigners. I met one guy in Thailand who would charge $10 for his editing services and he would have approximately 20 clients per week. Not a bad way to earn $800 bucks per month.

Busking – Do you have some kind of talent? Maybe you don’t have talent but you’re more than willing to have people laugh at you, especially if they’ll throw their spare change in your hat. Many, many travelers are playing guitar, juggling, dancing and singing their way around the world. It may not be legal in some places though, so be sure to check the rules.

Volunteer Work – In most cases, this won’t pay, but you’ll have an unforgettable experience while usually saving money on room and board, which is just like getting paid! You don’t have to spend a lot of money with large global operations in order to volunteer as there are local organizations in every country that would love to have you. One good website is GrassrootsVolunteering.org.

Work Exchange – Just check out the listings on HelpX.net and you’ll be ready to pack your bags today. If you’re willing to work a few hours each day in exchange for room, board and sometimes, some extra cash, there is no shortage of opportunities. There’s also WWOOF.org which focuses on organic farm work.

Be Creative! – One of the best examples of this involved a female traveler I met in Central America who had funded over 6 months of travel by using a very simple business model. She would hop from beach town to beach town, contact several local tour operators (who usually offered snorkeling and scuba diving trips) and then worked out a deal. In exchange for bringing them business, she would receive a good commission. Each day she would hang around the hostels and travelers cafes and recommend the tour operators she was working with. Let’s just say she was doing very well. So put on your thinking cap, brainstorm some ideas and don’t be afraid to get creative!

And that’s the list. I really do hope that this has helped you realize that you can make money and travel, that earning money on the road is not as impossible as you once thought. If it were impossible, there certainly wouldn’t be so many people, from countries all around the world, traveling and working as they explore this great planet of ours.

Of course, there are many more ways to earn money while traveling as well, so if you have anything you’d like to add or share, please leave your thoughts in the comments below. The more opportunities we list, the more we can help each other!


If you are interested in more details about how to start traveling, you may want to read my “How to Live a Life of Travel” eGuide. It’s specifically designed to prove that a life of travel is not a crazy fantasy but a realistic lifestyle option instead.

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Comments 401

  1. Thank you Earl, This is Inspiring! you know working forever in a job you don’t love is quite frustrating but i just cant start travelling outside Philippines without having a penny in my pocket lol 🙂

    I’m hoping for some advice from you 🙂
    Thank you .

    1. Post
      Author

      Hey Daisy – Of course, money is definitely needed but luckily, you don’t need a ton of money and also, there are now so many opportunities to earn money online or on the road. It’s getting easier each day!

  2. Awesome post, I just came across it. I am an electrician and i know electrical systems are very different around the world. So while that may not be a possibility for potential work, i have experience in construction. Since you included construction on your list, I am wondering if you could provide more insight on how to score short term work in this field. In your years of travels, have you come across other travelers who made this work? Have you met locals that were seeking help in the field? I am curious on how/where one could come across this work opportunity. Thanks!!!

    1. Post
      Author

      Hey Tyler – With that kind of work, you could find countries that allow you to get a working holiday visa (such as Australia and New Zealand) or you could look for locals that need such help. There are websites such as workaway.info and helpx.net that advertise all kinds of work opportunities in exchange for room and board and sometimes you can use those contacts you make to find better, paid work in construction and similar fields.

  3. Hi Earl! It’s amazing what you’ve been doing for almost a decade! It’s an absolute inspiration and you’re one of the reasons why I started my own blog as well. I want to show fellow Filipinos that they too can travel even when they’re still a student like me! I hope you can check out my blog and let me know what you think! Cheers x

    1. Post
      Author
  4. thank you for the very comprehensive list Earl! I would add the caveat that gaining some degree of language skills before landing in a new place also makes your skills more marketable and can be helpful in persuading locals to give you a chance in a new job. Thanks for continuing your tradition of helping others like me who can’t imagine the thought of returning to our home countries to live, yet need a bit of encouragement from time to time!

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  6. I would like to purchase the guide to landing a job on a cruise ship but live in Australia. Would it still have benefit to me?
    Thankyou 🙂

    1. Post
      Author

      Yes it would! The guide works regardless of where you live as it provides the links to the proper ways to apply from your region. And things such as interviews are all done via Skype these days so location isn’t important. Hope that helps!

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  8. I am planning to travel to Italy and would like to know any ideas of what kind of work I could do there. I am an American Citizen, speak English and Spanish both very fluently.

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  10. You did a great job by creating such an extensive list Earl! I have posted a blog about ‘How people can travel by working remotely’, which also focus on various remote working programs, co-working spaces etc. I have linked to your blog in the article as it is very useful. Let me know what you think about the post. Thanks!

  11. Thank you so much for those great and creatives ways of making money while travelling. So inspiring for an eventual business project.

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  16. thank you for the very comprehensive list Earl! I would add the caveat that gaining some degree of language skills before landing in a new place also makes your skills more marketable and can be helpful in persuading locals to give you a chance in a new job. Thanks for continuing your tradition of helping others like me who can’t imagine the thought of returning to our home countries to live, yet need a bit of encouragement from time to time!

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  18. Awesome list Earl! I’ve long been an English teacher but I’ve been looking to switch things up to a stream of income where I have more freedom to be mobile and not stuck in one place all the time. Have you suggested writing e-Books as a form of passive income? If you can market your book well and build up a decent following it could end up being a formidable source of income for you, especially if you travel through developing countries where everything is usually much cheaper.

    1. Post
      Author

      Hey Ivan – I didn’t add that one to the list because it’s a difficult one. Without a large following or without a way to get a lot of people to see that eBook and to trust the person who wrote it, sales will be very low to non-existent. That could be something later down the line for someone who grows an audience but they need to grow the audience first and that takes time.

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  21. Hi Rosie,

    I understand your point of view. However, I would not underestimate the experience of having a gap year and surviving out of creative ideas. I am a graduate who have now lived in 4 countries in 3 different continents. I do not see anything wrong about taking time to simply travel. Human beings live for an average of 80 years nowadays, there is nothing wrong about dedicating half or full year to discovering other cultures and yourself. Even though i have been very lucky professionally, I wish I had dedicated more time for this in my early age. I have seen successful people who have taken their time to travel around the world on a shoestring (including many MBAs from very good universities)

  22. If you can stand laying a year’s groundwork, I think you can totally pull off your travel dreams and earn a degree. I would spend a single year at school, on campus learning in a pretty traditional way
    – for starters it’s a great experience and you meet so many interesting people that way. And first year courses are a great way to find out what you’re good a, passionate about and spark some ideas about what you might want to do later on.
    -While you’re doing this, Id try to maintain a job with easy to translate skills – think cafe/restaurant based work, admin/customer service stuff – something that has a pretty universal application. This gives you marketable skills, something for the resume and will help you put away a little cash over the year.
    – do a 2 semester study abroad trip! This is literally the best perk of going college. Every school I’ve ever come across offers an exchange program with partner universities all over the world, or there are organisations that can organise it for you. Depending on your degree, you can continue earning credit towards it, but you can do it from somewhere new and interesting. Most places will even let you split it and do two semester long exchanges in two different cities/countries. Depending on where you go, you can often work in some limited capacity, or there are often scholarships and aides you can apply for to help fund it. Pick a place to go in a region you want to explore (or study in Prague and spend your breaks and before/after the exchange exploring other parts of Europe. You also get the bonus of very safe accomodation and lots of on the ground support which can be very helpful on your first long term trip, especially as a solo female traveller.
    – once exchange is done you will have a tonne of experience, a much better idea of what you want to do next and you’ll have a pretty impressive resume. Now would be the time to look into online learning options (which are sometimes better available to upperclassmen) and/or a working holiday visa.

    If you have questions, don’t hesitate to dm me! I’m runawayrosie_ on Instagram

  23. Hi Derek,

    My friend is working as a travel blogger in Spain. Originally, she was from India and she has been literally travelling across the world like you and writing down the thoughts.

    Your post is the perfect bet for people like me who like to save money every single time, they undertake a trip. Now, having said that, you have just gone a step further by actually helping us to earn money while enjoying the luxuries of life. What a “wow” moment!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I am sure, it is people like you who are quite tempting me to start travelling myself by putting better use of my skills in saving money, let’s see what’s in store for me.

  24. Hello, I loved your list, if I had seen this before when I was looking for something on how to make money while traveling few years ago, it would have made it easier for me to find something suitable.
    Working on a cruise ship was always a job I wanted to try, even though its a very hard job, you get to see amazing places. Somehow I never got to try it.

    2 years ago I had come across a business opportunity which I never knew it existed and its a great way to earn money while you are on a holiday actually. It is to recommend a travel service and get incentive holidays and commissions of the turnover. It is very rewarding and give you free time you want. Its called network marketing.
    I didn’t see the type of jobs in your list so I thought I mentioned it.
    Thanks for the list again.

    1. Hi Nicoletta, I would like to ask you more about your business opportunity. Please if you would give me the full name of the company you work with. I’d like to check it out. I find an abundance of network marketing on the internet but none like you describe.
      Thank you. Carol

  25. as I push my way through my forties and the strings that tie me down begin to decrease and my freedom from responsibilities begin to increase, the idea of a nomadic lifestyle are pulling hard on me.

    I love my job as an elementary school teacher, but the pull of adventure is much stronger. Of course the obstacle of how to fund that kind of life change is always on my mind.

    I am hoping that my skills as a beekeeper can be the ace in the hole as countries all over the world are facing a shortage of qualified apiarists. My dream is to be able to move through countries and continents and work as a beekeeper to fund my nomadic lifestyle.

    does anyone know anybody who has done this before?

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  27. Hi Earl,
    Thank you for a great article. I quitted my job back in April and start traveling through out Europe for two and a half month now by using my saving. Came across with your article at this time is great!

    1. Hi, Arty!

      By any chance did you get some kind of job in Europe…even without a working visa?
      I’ve been going back and foward the past 5 years but even if I tried some Cvs and Linkedin…I was never able to find some kind of job…
      Some of teh options listed on this post are interesting but I’m always in doubt because of the visa thing…

      How it’s been for you so far?

  28. Hi Earl I am senior in high school and all my life I knew I wanted to travel. I can’t see nor stand to be in place. I need to be free and its something I’m willing to do anything for. But the thing is I’m not good at a lot of things and I still want to attend college. So if I were to do my classes online and travel I still wouldn’t know how to make good money. I see I have some choices thanks to your list but its not something I’m confident in. I want something stable but I don’t mind the struggles of hoping jobs. Your traveling experiences have really inspired me and I want to do it too. I just need a little help. Thanks.

  29. Thanks Earl! Great list, think I have tried a lot of things over the past 5 years being on the road, but love my freelance work in several fields. My teaching career is off the list unless it is part-time. Quit full-time teaching 5y ago. But hey when you live this lifestyle you meet a lot of jealous people, who turn green. Even after recommending things to do and opportunities they are green, because many realize that they have not one single talent to make money on the road and they are also to proud to do volunteer work/hostel work etc.

    We are blessed. Thanks for the great list.

  30. Hi Earl! I’ve actually just started blogging, 3 months now. I don’t own the site though. I just contribute. What I would like to do is start a blogsite of my own. However, I’m still in the conceptualization phase and I’m struggling. Can you give me some advice on how to actually get started?

  31. Hi, I just finished my first year at a community college and have no idea of what i want to study for a career. I have considered being a travel blogger, but i don’t know if am a good enough writer. Also i don’t want to disappoint my parents if it doesn’t work out because they are paying for my education. I also want to travel the world instead of being stuck in a classroom or office all day, but i want to continue my education. Do you know of any way to travel and still learn? and do you know how to balance both?

    1. Hey Katie – The good news is that there is so much to learn out there and once you figure out what you would like to focus on, you’ll be able to find classes, courses, retreats, and more to help you gain the knowledge you want. But the key is figuring out what you want to learn first and then you can start to narrow it down in order to find the destination most suitable for learning that subject.

  32. Hey Earl!

    Thank you so so much for putting together such great content. I am currently an au pair in Australia and am deciding which route I want to take after my visa expires here. I now have 40+ options to chose from thanks to you haha. Safe to say I’ll be doing lots of research the coming months. Thanks for starting your blog way back when and for keeping up with it so regularly. Love you writing and reading about your adventures. Cheers!

    – Amber

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  34. I have a unique situation. My hub and I have 3 sons(11,13,15) and we all want to work and learn together. We are worldschoolers. We would love to do something like workaway.info where we could meet others, learn skills, help, etc. However, we need money to get us from place to place and to explore a bit. We are educated and have skills.

    My hub worked 20 years in IT. We both have TEFL certs. We just returned from teaching in China for a year. I have a degree in holistic nutrition and certs in yoga, reflexology, personal training, Pilates and life coaching.

    We’ve created 2 all natural products that we could sell.

    My question to you is: What would you see as the best, most stable course of income for a family of 5 to travel around for cultural experience. We don’t want a 9-5 but are absolutely willing to work..

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  36. Good stuff man! I appreciate your content you put out. I’m currently traveling the US in a van and have been living off my savings for the past two and a half months that has dwindled down to not a whole lot but just wanted to say that this was the right post to come across at the right time. Launching my blog in the very near future. Looking forward to possibly connecting with you!

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  38. Hey earl ,
    First of all thank you so much ..!!
    Great & inspired article , I’m 22 year younger girl . i have 1 year experience in travel industry ,i’m fed up of working in desk job , i wish to traveling around the world in free of cost , I loved traveling , take a travel photographs & meet a different people , i’m professional photographer . I want to become a tour escort and also want to become a financially strong & help the ones around me who are struggling in life . please kindly assist me with your export guidance.
    Thanks dear.

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  41. Hey Earl,
    I’m fed up of working in a BPO and in night shifts for the past 15 years. I wish to go to a foreign country, I love teaching, I teach English currently just as a past time, i know a bit of french too. I want to develop these and move to any foreign country and earn well. I really want to do something useful with my life, I want to become financially strong and help the ones around me who are struggling in life. Kindly assist me with your expert guidance earl. Thanks

    1. Hey Justin – You’ll find plenty of info on the blog to get started my friend. Teaching English overseas, especially since you already have experience, would be your best bet to get going and that can lead to all sorts of opportunities. It’s all about taking the first step and seeing where it leads!

  42. Hey Earl- great, creative article. I’m turning 27 yrs old, wanderlust dreams for years of traveling! lol so true that where does time go? Been in my small rural town in PA for too long- I just finally took a few road trips that have been on my heart… drove to Mid-West (seen Colorado and South Dakota) then I flew in Los Angeles, drive to San Diego, San Francisco and Venice CA- the Pacific Coast Highway is enthrallinggg! so beautiful! anywho, I love this article cause I think myself and most ppl get stuck on the ‘money’ aspect, but more so, the decision to quit that ‘secure’ safe job of 9 to 5 and steady income and actually go into the unknown. I love the philosophy of “Leap and the net will appear.”

    Pretty funny about the starring in Bollywood films lol thats awesome! For now, the biggest obstacle for me is deciding on the title of my blog.. cant decide if I want my name in it or something more general.. How has your name worked for you? have you considered changing it since you started? Thanks for the articles and thoughtful info

    1. Hey Dan – I wouldn’t think too much about it. The main thing is that it’s catchy and it gives some indication of what the site is about although, these days, that second part isn’t as important. You just want to make sure that it’s easy for people to remember.

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  45. Hey Earl, What would you suggest for a tall, healthy, fit 56 year old man? This scares the heck out of me but I’d like to give it a go. My skills are in healthcare management but no degree. I’ve recently been let go from my job and am having trouble finding another. I have about 100k saved but don’t want to blow through it.

    Thanks in advance for your response.

    Mark

    1. Hey Mark – My advice is generally to create a long list of every skill, piece of knowledge, ability, hobby and interest that you have. Then, you can examine that list more closely and slowly try to determine which items on the list can translate to jobs overseas or opportunities that would allow you to work, travel and earn money. That’s always the best method in my opinion because there isn’t any official ‘go to’ opportunity that anyone can just jump on to get started, apart from teaching English. With your background though, I’m sure you’ll be able to find ways to put it to good use and create the lifestyle you’re looking for!

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  50. hey earl,
    i am at a cool place called kerala.. always wanted to explore my own backyard and maybe find a route, with some adventure, but havent started on it… just happpened on your article and page.. both super charged!! and i feel like this urge in me must be follwed thru..

    am going to start this !and hope to keep checking with you for advice and guidance!!!
    man you are really living the life i keep dreaming of!

    merrry christmas to you Earl!

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  52. Dear Earl,

    First of all, thank you for being so honest in your article. If you don’t have an open mind to do things while you travel, then one can only travel for leisure. I will be 29 years old soon and all I wanted to do was to travel the world and work along. But instead, I am stuck in a desk job. I am getting into Scuba Certification soon and will complete the Master Dive followed by that.
    Are there any other suggestion you can give me to which other certifications I can do while traveling the world where I am doing a decent job and earning enough.

    Best regards,
    Harriet Coutinho

    1. Hey Harriet – The thing is, I would first look at what you’re interested in. If you get a scuba certification for example and you realize that you don’t enjoy it, then you won’t be happy. Same with a TEFL certificate or sky-diving certification or any other kind. So once you figure out what you’re actually interested in doing while traveling, then you can look at ways to make it happen!

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  55. Hello Earl,
    thank for interesting article.

    I have a question please help me:D When you freelance, the webdesign for example, how do you make the “bill”? Like, do you have a business set in your name in your home country? So when you travel like this, you probably need to have a “company” in your name in your home country and then you also pay taxes in this country while moving around the world?
    I would love to do this but I am just a bit confused how to pay taxes and make the invoices. Thank you so much:)

    1. Hey Petra – That really depends on your home country and the rules you must follow in terms of taxes. Every country has different rules for people who work online or spend a lot of time overseas. But in general, yes, setting up your work as a self-employed business and paying taxes to your home country is something that is necessary.

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  57. u are really a great traveller, thanks for your advice .Earl I really want to appreciate u because u have really make some of us to appreciate and have the right mind to travel. in my own case,I have never travel out of my country but I have really been thinking of how I will travel out ,I don’t even have an international passport, I don’t even know where to start, pls I will love u to fixe me up.it has been my dream to also visit and work outside my country but don’t even know where to start pls do something about it,I have experience in different fields, thank u

  58. Hello !

    Thanks for those advice ! But I would need some advice from you. There goes my little story :

    I’ve always wanted to travel. I live in a little town in Québec and I never went far away from where I live(like 5 hours is the top). Where I need advice is that since I know I can probably work from place to place in different kind of things, I would like to know how would it be. Cause I’ve got a back surgery in the past and I can’t do everything.

    Second thing, I think that what stop me from doing it is that I’m scare to fail. Like I’ve just finished college I have my degree, but I got my school debt to pay back AND I got a car rent to pay per week. So is it possible to travel and to pay for those things and everything else?

    Last thing, Is that better to go with my car, or on foot. Like take a backpack, and go for it?

    Thanks for answer !

    1. Hello Yoan
      Go for it!
      Take your car.
      And get bicycle.
      Make connections in places before you go there.
      Be positive
      Alexander Your buddy

  59. Hi there Earl,
    do you have any advice for someone who is 19 I want to travel and the thing is i don’t have a specialty in my working career unless you count fast food! I know you learn when you are abroad but in all honesty I need some kind of advice… how did you start it all and what do you recon I should do?
    kind regards
    laura 🙂

  60. What about selling plasma in Europe? I know a few people here in the US that sell their plasma for a little extra cash. I was just wondering if US citizens are allowed to donate across the pond? If so how much do donors recieve on average?

    1. Can’t talk for whole europe but in finland you can donate blood or stem cells for free and around 50-150€ respectively. Country of origin doesn’t matter but they will ask you about earlier donations or transfusions and travel at malaria-rsk zones etc

  61. Hi Earl,

    Looks like your doing it right! Hoping to do the same once finished uni.

    Just a few questions having trouble finding an answer to….by the way I will probably go down the route of improving peoples websites.

    1. How do you go about the visa? E.g. do you have to come in and out of the country once a month for a new visit visa?

    2. What sort of deals do you get along the route? E.g. A hotel says do our website for $300 and 2 weeks stay?

    Thanks!

    1. Hey Charles – The visa situation is different for every single country. You need to look up the rules as it pertains to you (as per your nationality) when heading to a new country. Some countries allow you to just show up and stay for 30 days, some for 90 days, some for longer. Some countries require you to get a visa online before you arrive or you might have to get a visa from an Embassy or Consulate first. You need to do some research to figure out the visa rules of each country.

      As for deals, there’s no standard. You simply can try to offer whatever skills you have in exchange for whatever you and the hotel thinks is fair!

  62. Hi Earl,

    I just got addicted to traveling after spending my last bunch of saving to traveled to Bali & Penang. Basically to get myself recovered from mental trauma. It was not really working well but it was worth it. I found myself enjoying and craving for next exploration, as I have been an experience seeker my whole life.
    Back to your topic though. Do your think earning sufficient money to travel at low cost sounds easy when you are native English speaker? I have seen many travel blogger talking about teaching English as way to earn or exchange with accommodation/food. I am good at English comparing to most of people in my country (yes, I’m from Thailand). But Is it that enough for teaching in foreign countries? Do I need a certificate or verification in order to take this path as one income streams? I used to be an English language tutor to (Thai) elementary schoolers for 5 years and now working as a client service manager in design and advertising company. Trying to arm myself with blogging and some digital marketing skills is also my plan for letting earn while traveling, too.

    1. Hey Chira – That’s hard for me to say. You would simply have to apply and see how it goes. But most likely, you would need some kind of certification if English isn’t your native language.

    2. You usually need to be a native speaker to teach abroad and also have a degree. Those are for your work visa. In some places you may be able to find something, but it really depends on the country and the school. And as Earl mentioned sometimes they require TEFL certification too.

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  67. hello Earl
    I have planned to travel Beirut in august 2015 so I need a help to make program in 7 days and how much will cost probably ?

  68. Hi Earl, I have graduated from commerce, living in Rajasthan state of India and I am 23 now, and I want to spend rest of life travel every peace of land on earth. Biggest problem with me is I am not earning anything. I am looking for a job which can allow me accomplish my dreams. Please guide me on this.

  69. This article is great! Will certainly be looking into some of these. It’s always put me off a bit not having a travel buddy! I’ve been travelling around America and Canada for the past three months and it really does cost a lot! I’m hoping the tips here will help me to continue to see the world. Thanks!

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  72. Hey Earl, this is such a great article and gave me lots of ideas! now all that’s left is to pack up and actually leave! 🙂

  73. hey earl ! I’m a 21 year old commerce and law student in my final year from India and i’m just so sick of the rut i’m in and all i want to do now is travel. i have traveled before to all of three countries but with my parents but now i want to travel by myself without having to ask my parents for it. I’m fluent in English and I’m very well educated but traveling across the world is what i want to do now. please suggest me how i can achieve this ? i have a 3 month summer vacation and i don’t want to spend it interning at a law firm.

  74. Hi!
    My husband and I want to spend a year traveling south america on a ridiculously low budget. One of your tips to teach a skill you have is a great idea since he plays guitar and teaches people here but Im just wondering what people do with things like guitars when they go on multi day treks. When traveling long term like this I assume also there will be other stuff that I may need day to day but wont want to bring on hikes where we will be camping and having to carry everything up a mountain. Do people normally leave their stuff somewhere or take it with? Any tips would be great!

    1. Hey Nava – There are always places to leave stuff. If you’re staying in a town, maybe at a hostel, and you plan to do a hike, you can usually leave your stuff locked up at the hostel. I’ve never had a problem finding a place to leave my stuff if I don’t want to take it with me for a while and it’s usually at the accommodation I stay at.

  75. Hi Earl

    Americans. Europeans , Aussie nd new Zealand people’s are the luckiest people’s they can travel anywher anytime .they can explore the world . No need visa no need to stand in the line no need interview by visa officers in embassy nd then interview by the immigration at the arrival destination .just take passport ticket nd go tats all ….

    Wow I love travelling I wish if I had tat powers to travel . I was recently in Thailand just back this 22nd april …for us to get Thailand visa was like asking for a million dollars loan ..submitted passport with 2kg worth of documents nd visa approved after 4 weeks lol ….

    I love travelling I wish if we just have entry ( NO VISA NEEDED ) to Asia only would be more then enough .but sadly it wont happen. ..well this site is really amazing I have European friends wil forward it to them coz for me even I ask in Cambodia embassy in Bangkok to give me visa I wana tour over ther nd they reject it hahaha ..

    Well best wishes to all European Americans aussies new Zealanders you guys are having nice beautiful life ..may you be exploring more nd more nd be on the road to see the world …

    Nasrullah Ahmad from Pakistan .

    1. I totally relate to what you are saying, i would love to buy a one way ticket to the land of oportunities but that’s just not possible since they just give me a 3 month touistic visa IF i manage to prove that I’m not a threat as in… having a job, an account with money, a return ticket, a sponser job… and it goes on an on. I really wanted to do a working holiday but that is not possible for peruvians. Be can not afford to be so free, spontaneous and not planned ahead like other young people….Maybe one day we will have the same oportunities…. but you can still travel and accomplish your goals… it’s just gonna take a little more time effort and money!

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  79. Hi Earl!
    Your blog is truely inspiring! Traveling this beautiful planet is a big dream of mine and reading this blog has made it feel closer to becoming a reality, so thank you! But I would love to bring my dog with me wherever I go (I could never leave her behind) and I fear she would complicate things, such as finding a places to stay that allow pets and having to leave her there while I’m off giving surfing lessons or serving drinks. Do you think it would still be possible to travel the world, lugging around a border collie?
    Thanks so much,
    Kelsey

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  84. This article puts me at ease. I am planning my first overseas trip, to Thailand/Cambodia and I am want to make it long term, but I have been terrified that I may not be able to make any money while there. This has given me a few ideas, and I will definitely be borrowing some of these! Thanks Earl for giving travelers the confidence that they need to succeed!!!

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  86. Hi everyone,

    My name is Tim and I’m finishing up my last year of college and looking to travel around the world. I just want to see as much as I can, but I don’t have a lot of money and no majorly notable skills, other than I am an EMT and hoping to become a firefighter fulltime. So I was just curious of what is a good successful way to try and travel the world or what ways to your k owledge typical have the best success.
    Thanks!

    1. Hey Tim,
      I’m fresh out of school too now and am planning on travelling the world also! I’m involved with this company that lets me run my own business part-time online and it is international, so I can do it anywhere. If your into nutrition/lifestyle, or are looking to get healthier yourself, you might be interested in this! I figured since you were an EMT this might be of interest to you! Just figured I’d throw it out there! You can shoot me an email if you want! [email protected]

  87. @Lisa – Yes, it is very possible to be a single mom and travel with children. I met a single mom who traveled around the world for a year with her 7 year old daughter. She said she had saved $18k but only ended up spending around $14k. They had an adventure of a lifetime and when they came back to the U.S., her daughter had the best grades in class and asked when they could do it all again!!

  88. thank you so much for this entry. i think it’s quite good for me and everybody.I really really admire you. can you approve for me tranlate it into Vietnammese,and sharing on my facebook? thanks again. hope your answer,best wish for you.

  89. Hi Olivia, I’ve just came across your comment from a while back so hopefully you see this. Like you I’m a single mum to my 2 year old girl, I’m a nurse and leave in 7 months for Indonesia. I’ve travelled a lot in the past but have never worked while away. Like you I couldn’t imagine working as a nurse due to having the little one but I have the idea of offering informal childcare/babysitting services to other tourists or expats or even Au Pairing could be an option?? It would be great to hear from you if you do ever go away or if you have any other ideas 🙂

  90. Wow. These are great! Thanks so much for the wonderful suggestions. I wrote a handful of them down! I am 24 (25 New Years Day) and just moved from Nashville to Colorado, although my roots are in Iowa. I am currently jobless (but searching avidly) and staying with a family friend. I want to build a tiny home and renovate and live in an airstream and TRAVEL. I am overwhelmed by the amount of other people out there doing what I so badly feel like I need to be doing. I have a four year degree, a minor in Spanish, a blog and it’s just me myself and I! With an entire world of opportunities out there how is it that I remain so stuck?! You’ve got to start somewhere though right? It’s a daunting task, but the end result will make it all worth while. After all you can’t put a price on happiness. Thanks for your advice Earl and I look forward to starting my journey while making an income asap!!

  91. Hey Earl!
    This was always a major concern for me was how to sustain my travels while out in a foreign country. I am 27 years old and was thinking about getting an education in massage therapy or something that enables me to travel and still have a stable income. On the other hand I am getting older and would like to start my traveling now.
    What is your opinion should I wait and get a degree or start my new adventure!
    Thanks in advance and have a safe journey!
    Mike

    1. Hey Michael – That’s a tough one for me to say because it depends on so many factors. But I can say that 27 isn’t too old of course and plenty of people start their travels much later in life. I would just think about all of your options and determine which one feels most right for you at this time…that’s generally the best option!

      1. Thanks!
        Just asking the questions gave me the answer I was looking for.
        I am going to start with a one year plan and find out exactly how necessary and useful the additional education would be.
        I really appreciate your response and your blog!

        1. Hi Mike – I’m 47 years young and planning my world travel. You’re are only as old as you think…Wish I was 27 gain…LOL

  92. I stumbled across your blog and the more I read the more excited I got I am 25 just started my career and not say I don’t love it but I don’t feel as satisfied as I thought I was going to being 25 starting a career and doing well l felt like I was following the steps and typical lifestyle everyone around me was and It’s not exactlying what I want. I took a solo trip to Greece and absolutely loved it met a ton of locals and friends and since then all I’ve wanted to do is to continue travelling my biggest fear was running out of money and hearing people tell me “I told you you couldn’t afford it”. Every one thinks I’m crazy but I really want to travel and learn different cultures even if it’s just for a year or two. I just need to get started it’s still kind of scary and I have a bit of hesitation even though I know I’ll be fIne.

    1. hi there karyne im 24 and been working since 18, its not easy to travel while preparing for the future you know, wow you’re lucky u been to greece, its been my dream to travel as much as i can im gonna start in asia for now maybe 1 or 2 destination per year, but damn i wish we can find ways to travel while saving enough for the future.. anyway goodluck on your travel 🙂 oh one thing im gonna try bringing a folding bike and a tent when i travel so i don’t need hotels for cheaper travel i hope itll work fine,, take care 🙂

    2. Karyn, I’m in the same exact position. I’m 25 and have a great steady job that I love. Fortunately this job lets me travel all over the US, but I just feel so unfulfilled. I’d love to be able to drop everything and become a nomad working remotely, but I’m a little uneasy about taking the plunge.

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  95. Hey earl,
    I’m just a high school student but I’m going to start college real soon. My passion has always been to travel the world. I always wanted to be in a country for 6 months to a year or more and work at the same time with good pay. I also want to learn different martial arts.Any suggestions on what I could possibly do? Thanks I would really appreciate it if you reply thanks!

    1. Hey Stephanie – You have to get creative! There are infinite ways to earn money out there and you just need to read as many posts like this and examples of others who have achieved their travel goals. This will help you start thinking creatively and figure out what would work for you!

  96. How do you just, “head out” with $200 in your pocket? I live in Canada, that seems so far away from the rest of the world and so expensive just to get anywhere!

    1. Hey Mikey – You just need to figure out where you want to go and how much it will cost to get there. Figure that out, earn/save that amount of money and make it happen. There are countries you could travel to where you could find work (Australia), so getting there is the main thing. Once you can do that, you’re on your way.

  97. Hi!
    Before Earl comes, I just wanted to let you know that you don´t need to save for year on a new job just to travel. If you want to travel, just head out! As soon as you start you will realize that it is not as scary as it sound… =)
    But if your problems come from social or family pressure, then you will have to decided if you can live without following you dream to travel, so you can keep everyone else happy about your life.

    See you around the world!
    Good travels!

  98. Hi wondering Earl. I am in the United Stated and I have always wanted to travel to West Africa to volunteer with children and woman. I also would love to help build and help under developed countries built homes etc.. How can a kind hearted person provide help in Africa for little or no money??????

  99. Hi Akeed, I am a programmer too who loves to travel around the world, I really have passion for traveling and work over the Internet but I haven’t got any opportunity. Kindly hook me up if you get any openings.. Thanks

  100. Hey Earl.. I’m (21) a Graduate from India… always dream to travel the world… but never ever got any great idea to start that…. I’m too much confused about my career… did History Graduation (2014:July), but after that I found that my dream is to travel the world… My plan is to study Law for next 3 yrs… & establish myself in that field…. and after saving a good money… I’ll travel for atleast 2 months per year….. apart from that I’m good in PhotoJournalism… wanted to travel on basis of job in Reuters, AP, AFP etc.. but because of my finance I was unable to choose that risky career…………….. According to u… which decision would b great for my dream?????????

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  102. Hey Qian,
    I have the exact same idea as you.
    The only thing I know is that I want to travel the world (permanently)
    I’m 18 years and I too am thinking about going to college and I’m not sure what I should study but recently I have thought about being a traveling programmer and so I have decided to study for a Computer Science degree in college.
    What I plan to do is to get a job as a programmer and then travel the world while working over the internet.
    Tell me if you have any ideas of your own.
    Akeed.

    1. Hi Akeed! Just realized ur message to me after a decade! I went to college and took Mass com which I’ve no idea why. I’ just finished my 1st sem (3 months) for this course and I’m on sem break right now. Tbh I’m pretty sick of getting stuck in college already, and am deciding if I wan to quit this course. If I quit, My next plan
      Is to go find some academy to take short courses for photography or korean language or culinary class, etc. jus so I’m still constantly learning and hopefully these skills will help me to earn some money when I go travel permanently one day. I’m also hoping to get a chance to work on a cruise too!
      What about you? How’s life going on?
      Qian

    2. Hi Akeed! Just realized ur message to me after a decade! I went to college and took Mass com which I’ve no idea why. I’ just finished my 1st sem (3 months) for this course and I’m on sem break right now. Tbh I’m pretty sick of getting stuck in college already, and am deciding if I wan to quit this course. If I quit, My next plan
      Is to go find some academy to take short courses for photography or korean language or culinary class, etc. jus so I’m still constantly learning and hopefully these skills will help me to earn some money when I go travel permanently one day. I’m also hoping to get a chance to work on a cruise too!
      What about you? How’s life going on? Btw, where r u from? I’m a Chinese from Malaysia.
      Qian

  103. Thanks for the post Earl. I found your site after reading Just One Way Ticket. I’m trying to break in to the field myself, it’s been a work in progress for about a year now! Thanks for the tips. Check out my site.

    Lucy

  104. Hey Earl
    Thank you for the great post… I’m getting closer and closer to starting my travelling adventures. Do you have any tips on how to get started?
    Also, is anyone looking for a travel friend:)?

    -Mal

  105. Hello Earl,

    Im so excited to stumble upon your blog , travelling the world to experience the natural beauty was my childhood dream, for a long time I was searching for free volunteering work abroad from websites like freevolunteering.net,seveninterchange etc., and in fact they did gave me some good responses but most of time the work or destination was not very accessible for me. Im from India, and from a lower middle class background ( I earn only $500 a month out which I could save only $250 pm).

    I really liked the work oppurtunties you mentioned to finance ourselves while we travel abroad.
    Hey how about selling some fruits or self made snacks to the locals? You will amazed to know the variety of Indian snacks that can be made from simple food grains oil and spices. Just a thought!

    I would keep coming here to search for some advices on how to finance our vactaions abroad 🙂

    Wish all the travelers for a wonderful experience on their respective journeys !
    thanks!

  106. Hello Earl, awesome tips, advice and stories, truly an amazing read, found you through an internet search seeking info on how to live this lifestyle, tired of living in one place and have now an online business that allows me the freedom to operate not only wherever there is internet, but also in 24 COUNTRIES and growing, offering all kinds of services that people are already using each and everyday for wholesale up to free !
    What i am looking to do is research and follow my dream of exploring the world without the burden that so many of us like minded ppl have of how do we fund our travels.
    Maybe i can start by offering a way and learn some of the ins n outs of traveling (“_”)

  107. Hey there Earl 🙂 I’m 17 and going to college soon so I need to figure out what course do I want to study ASAP and so I started asking myself what really interest me and there’s a list of them but the one tat rly excites me was to make travelling as my job and so I started to do research on it and came across to ur blog which I thought was INCREDIBLE but I still have no idea which course I should study so tat it is related to travelling around the world! I wish u could help! Thx!

    P.s U ARE SRSLY AWESOME EARL!

  108. Thanks for the tips. I’m 24 and in need of escaping secluded life. I wanna travel for a year or so and see what’s out there, and hopefully discover my place in it as I go. The one thing I was worried about was how to earn money as I go. I work with children and there is some good ideas up there that I could look into. Thank you

  109. A good way to earn money would be to work as a chef at local restaurants ir hostels, emphasizing your home country’s foods. Im 17.5 yo and I have heard of many people from my country( Greece )making a living via offering souvlaki and gyros abroad. That is what I was initially thinking too but you have given me a lot of great ideas! Thaks a lot. I hope i meet you someday and make a souvlaki for you 😀

  110. Hey Earl, I just stumbled across your blog by mistake. I was browsing for a way out of my current boring routine. I’m still young (23) , and overly excited to consume the world before my life comes to an end. I’ve lived a pretty straight forward , boring , chilled life. I’ve traveled around a lot , but never bag-packed or just followed my feet to anywhere. I guess uve been on the road for more than 14 yrs now and loving it.. I don’t want 14 yrs , i just want maybe 1 yr and since i’m young it might open my eyes to what i rly want to do. I’ve studied alot of entrepreneurship and that’s my focus ( running my own show). Hate being underneath someone or at the bottom of the damn food chain.

    I like what ur doing and i completely support u man!

    Got any suggestions for a guy like me ? 🙂

    Cheers

  111. I am new to this blog. I am also a tourist and love to explore new places. You have provided a long ques of opportunities to earn money while traveling. I have the grip on the writing. It will prove beneficial for me to earn money through my writings whenever I am traveling abroad because money is the biggest necessity of the human beings.

  112. I love your “anything is possible” attitude. It is re-inspiring me to get back out into the world. I moved to NYC one year ago at the age of 32 because I felt that I needed to “grow up” and figure out a way to work and save enough to buy a home/plot of land out west. I went to college in the High desert of AZ and used to spend all my free time on the road. Now after one year of living in NYC all I want to do is run! Don’t get me wrong, their is plenty here for people, but I need nature. I have two dogs and a pickup truck, so I am pretty well equipped for domestic travel. There are so many questions to ask and topics to raise in relation to this….. Has anyone ever come out the other end of the wondering bliss with a place to call their own? I know at some point I will want to settle into a nice little plot.

    – Jon

    1. Hello Johnny,

      Its a fact that there are many beautiful, colourful and naturally wonderful places in this world.
      From my little experience I found sometimes you don’t get the right kind of job in the place you want to spend your entire life since its so beautiful – lush green meadows,bluish lakes and colourful flower fields…
      For example no skilled Software Engg can find an IT firm to work on java technology in Kashmir valley , India! 😀
      And other times you will find you have nice friends,good job and other nice engagements but you don’t really like the crowded and dirty roads and the slum outskirts of the place you are living.
      So in my opinion we have got to find a balance. We need our loved ones,family and engagements and also you want the peace and serenity of beautiful nature.
      I would just find a clean and decent environment to settle down as my base location for job/family/friends/social engagements and from time to time (may be 2 months in a year) save up money and travel the world on a vacation to find your inner fulfulfillment and serenity…
      I guess thats what most people does 🙂
      What do you say?

      thanks!

      ~Pujan

  113. hi earl, I am a new subscriber to your site and am very interested in the whole experience of a “digital nomad” (assuming you are familiar with the term!). I was interested if you can tell me of good paths to take in terms of a degree for living abroad. To be more specific I am interested in learning more about how I can take advantage of my years of college to be a “global citizen” i hope that the question is clear enough for you!

    Thanks,
    Stephan E.

    1. Hey Stephan – My advice is to study what you love in college as these days, almost any kind of knowledge or skills can be turned into an opportunity to live/work overseas. And if you don’t study something that you are truly interested in, it doesn’t matter if you’ll be traveling…if you don’t enjoy your work, you’re not going to enjoy the lifestyle. So, just think about what interests and excites you the most and that’s what you should study. There isn’t any one right path to this kind of lifestyle!

  114. Hi Earl,
    I spent hours reading your blog after I found it by being recommended to your book.
    I would love to travel with my 3 year old as a single parent and finding a job seems to be a bit difficulter to me. I work as a midwife, but can’t imagine working as a midwife abroad as I can’t take my child along and he is still too small to leave him somewhere else.
    I read about single parents travelling, working online sounds as a good option, only problem I have no single clue about that.
    P.s. I loved your video series live from here!
    Safe travels and best wishes!

    1. Hey Olivia – Great to hear from you and there are plenty of people out there in similar situations making it happen. My advice is to contact such single parents and ask them what they are doing to earn money and live this lifestyle. The more ideas you hear about, the more you’ll start to figure out a way for you to turn your idea into reality as well!

  115. Hello Earl,
    I am a 16 yr old girl who is very passionate about filmmaking and travelling and learning about new cultures and gaining knowledge. It has always been my dream to work behind the scenes on channels like Discovery or Fox, filming and shooting the different documentaries that are aired. Can you please advice me about how to achieve this? What kind of a graduation would I need? And what are the chances of getting opportunities of working like that? Please advice!
    Thank you!

    1. Hey Arry – Those are great goals but unfortunately, I don’t know anything about that industry so I can’t really offer any advice. I would have no idea what path would be best to end up with such a job.

  116. I have been applying for ESL jobs for the last six months and …………nothing.I am qualified and have experience!

  117. Hey Earl,
    Am a 17 year old sri Lankan guy… I love travelling and learning new stuff such as the culture, lifestyles, clothing of various parts of the world… Actually am in interest with jobs like working as an programme conductor or behind the camera crew member of organisations like the discovery channel.. Only draw back is that I have no work experience or much advanced education qualifications such as degrees plus am not in a state of offering any money prehand to the job… Can you please let me know the job opportunities that I can fit into.. 🙂 🙂

    1. Hey Rojitha – That’s hard for me to say as it depends on so many things, including all of your experiences. In general, you would need some university degree or solid work experience in a certain field in order to try and figure out which path might be a good one for you.

  118. Earl,

    On that note, do you need the working visa before you arrive in a country? Can you get a visa once you are in a place and get hired? Also, do things like WWOOFing require a visa? What if you aren’t technically getting paid, you are just given free accommodation in return for your services?

    Best,

    Julia

    1. Hey Julia – Technically, the only way to get a work visa in almost every country is to get hired first and then go through the process with the paperwork that your new employer provides. The only exceptions are the handful of countries that offer a working holiday visa program. As for WWOOFING, you just need a normal tourist visa usually and the same is true if you are not getting paid money.

  119. Well I still haven’t worked in a Bollywood film, but it’s on my To Do list for sure!!! It’s been a while since I looked at this list, and it’s nice to refresh my imagination, since I’ll be traveling again next month. I’m thinking about doing something with photography, and a service I could offer on fiverr.com . I’ve gotten my YouTube earnings up to about $75 a month so far, got some Adsense going on, and a new online job drop-shipping on ebay (https://www.dreameroftheday.com/ds-domination). What else…. I don’t know. Trying everything! Gotta save for those plane tickets, and the songs I want to record!

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  121. Hi!
    I am so grateful to have found your website and books. I actually heard about you from another blog site. I have done some traveling in the past, and before I went I thought it was only for the rich privileged people. I was so mistaken! Now that I have done everything I was told to (BA in Psych and post grad work gaining me a teaching credential) it is time for me to do what feels right (what has always felt right) in my heart. I also have debt 🙁 but! Reading your book explaining how you were able to make money in different situations that could help pay your debt, and you were still traveling has inspired me so greatly and lifted a weight from my shoulders. (Gosh, I was going to ask you one simple question about anything you might know on working in Greece. Which, I would still love to know any info you might know 🙂 !). I also wanted to comment on your rural blog post. It made me think about how amazing it would be to come upon a village and build my own house to live in while I was there (offering it to others when I depart), helping with local chores, going into the wilderness and collecting resources to barter with, making things for people, teaching them English in return for learning how to do a trade etc. Having it been 2.5 years since I last traveled (I lived in Vientiane, Laos teaching English) I feel I am past due to return. Coming across your life as an example that my true inner desires are a possible reality, and that I can get out of this trap I feel I am beginning to enter, is a gift I feel no other could give me. Thank you! So Much for being who you are and doing the things you do!

    ~Lisa

    1. Hey Lisa – That is all so wonderful to hear and with that kind of an attitude, I have no doubt you’re going to have some amazing experiences ahead. As for working in Greece, unfortunately, I don’t have much information to share as that’s just not something that I’ve done. With that said, I do know of people who find jobs working at some of the resorts on the various islands, so I guess that might be an option.

      And keep focused with your ideas about spending some time in your own house somewhere, exchanging work for education. Not a bad idea at all!

  122. Hi Earl, I love your list, it’s exquisite! I’ll certainly try and be more creative with the ways to earn money. I’ve been trying to save money to do some traveling while I’m young and freelancing, but to no avail so far 🙂 Money just come and go haha. By the way, the banknote in the middle of the photo with the peacock is the national banknote of my country – Macedonia. I bet you haven’t been there yet! Anyway, greetings and lovely post!

    ~Frosina

  123. Great article Earl, I love the idea of traveling from place to place, and doing some work for free accommodation etc. Unfortunately, as an African, it is quite hard to get visas to some parts of the world, but in theory, I would love to do that.

  124. Hey Earl! I really enjoy reading your articles. Ive been flirting more and more with the idea of taking off and working abroad, but I constantly fee like I should be in Canada, trying to make a living, paying off loans, blah blah blah… Im mid thirties, @ a crossroads with work, I have a BA in English, I am also a EU passport holder… Im just about fed up with normality, and feel like I need to live. I really want to travel, but work… can you suggest work or career ideas for Canadians who are EU passport holders. I think it’s silly that i’m still on native soil… I just feel like there is so much to do. Youve really given me a few ideas. Any more advice would be helpful.
    Thanks.

    1. Hey Nicholas – With the EU passport you can apply for anything in terms of work. So the career/work you should be looking for is something that excites you, something that you would absolutely love to do. What are your interests? Find potential positions in that area and start the search over in the EU!

  125. Wow, Earl. Your post is fascinating and it’s really inspiring me!!

    I’m gonna start my first long term travel this month. I’m from Indonesia. My first step is doing a voluntary work in Cambodia for 3 months. After Cambodia, I plan to keep moving for next 1 year. But I dunno where I should go next. Since I’m not coming from rich country, I prefer to start my travel in inexpensive countries like SE Asia. After that, any other Asia countries and Europe. I just have less than USD 1,000 in my pocket so I should manage to work while in travel. Last time I could hit Europe twice for cultural purpose, even though just for 2 weeks. But you gave me ideas that I could do it again for the longer time. Hope so..

    I’m looking some ways to support my travel. I’m thinking about volunteering, web designing, teaching language, and any other jobs. Your post reinforces me that work while traveling is very possible! All we need is courage and brave. I dunno what will happen to me or what I have to do after 3 months of my travel. But that’s life, we never know till it happens to us. Thanks for this great article, Earl!! 😀

    Best regards,
    Fitri

    1. Hey Fitri – It seems that you have the perfect attitude to turn your upcoming trip into long-term travel. Just stay positive and keep your eyes open for any and all opportunities that might appear!

  126. Hey Earl I just wanted to let you know that I have followed you for a while and recently picked up all my stuff and just went travelling. Unfortunately I was unable to generate enough money to support myself for a longer period and just after 5 months had to get back home which kinda sucks. I noticed you have many ebooks and was wandering what would you suggest is the best way to sell them and when writing them is there any basic trend you follow to create these books? I really want to continue travelling but was thinking of creating an online income prior to travelling so I set up a website on which I have documented all my progress. Would you have any ideas or suggestions I could follow?
    Regards
    Konrad

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  130. Hey Earl,

    Great advice. But my only problem is that I first decided to do medicine but now even before applying to medical school I had a change of heart. I always loved travelling. Now, what scares me is that I am not good at any things you listed above. I always wanted to be the person who visits different countries talk about how beautiful the place is and tries their cuisines and write or talk about it. I have no idea what they are called maybe travel advisors? or travel journalist? How can I possibly become that? or start my career in it? Also, I did bachelors but I have no job to pay any of these. How can I possibly start?

    1. Hey Soha – That’s what this site is all about…have a look around and you’ll find plenty of posts to help you out!

  131. This article gave me so much info and hope in escaping these shitty soul sucking jobs. I dont plan to do them forever but while I wrap up school and getting a few books finished… I want to LIVE!!! Thank you for your article!!!! You can sleep easy knowing you saved someone. 🙂

  132. Hey Earl, first thing is great ideas on this site! Second is I need some tips. I left my decent salary/easy life in California, for this little country called Portugal(not Spain). I’m sure we all have been in this position before. Anyway, I now live with my girlfriend that is actually from here. I got the residency card that keeps me in the schengen area for at least 5 years. But as you can imagine, the economic state here is quite bad at the moment . There are a lack of jobs. I have money saved up, but I need to start making some form of income no matter how small. Do you have any special advice concerning finding income in Portugal? Anything that is unique here that I can take advantage of?

    Best regards,
    James

    1. Hey James – Thanks for the comment. Unfortunately though, despite having been to Portugal a few times, I don’t know too much about the working situation/income opportunities over there. I have always visited as a tourist, traveled around and then left, without having looked for work or having done much research on the matter. Sorry I couldn’t be of more assistance!

  133. Hey Earl,

    Thanks for this post. I am planning to apply as a nurse in a cruiseship so I am wondering if I would be able to explore the world while working at the same time. I am wondering if I would have a “time-off” in a cruise ship. I went to a cruise ship about a year ago and everybody seems pretty busy and didn’t have time to enjoy and bask in the sun.

    Thanks.

    1. Hey Rochelle – Regardless of position, no crew member has a ton of free time in the ports. So working on cruise ships is less about full travel than about getting a taste of each place. As a nurse, you would have free time and you would be able to get off the ship in many ports and spend a good amount of time ashore. And in the end, I say that spending a few hours in Rome one day, a few hours in Athens the next, a few hours in Istanbul the day after is not a bad set up in the end 🙂

  134. Hey Earl! I have never really known what I wanted to do with my life, and with college looming around the corner, I feel even more rushed to decide. The only thing I was definitely sure of was that I wanted to travel the world. I’ve always wanted to do this. So, I tried to think of jobs and careers that would let me do just that. I’ve always liked English and am a native speaker, so I thought I would try that- looking up information about getting certified in teaching English as a foreign language is actually how I found your blog, and I’ve been hooked ever since! Anyways, I read that you taught English for some time as well, and was wondering if you had any tips for me? As in what I may need to be qualified in, or even just things that you learned or picked up while teaching it yourself. I would be grateful for just about anything you had to tell because I don’t know anyone that has done it.

    1. Hey Jessica – Thanks for the comment and to be honest, the main thing you need for teaching English is a university degree. Any degree will do but of course, if you have a degree in English, your chances of getting hired into a better teaching position are higher. Apart from that, you could also get a TEFL certificate which would help your cause even more. It’s not 100% necessary to get a job but again, it will help lead you to a better position. Hope that helps!

  135. Hi Earl.
    I chose not to write my real name for some reasons. First, like everyone else is saying I really like your blog. And have a few questions to ask. I am a model/actress and am quitting modeling because I am getting married, am pregnant and am moving to Europe. I can’t model around with a big tummy and none of my family or the tv stations or bookers I work with have any idea that I am pregnant and leaving the country soon. I do not speak Italian which is a bit hard if you think that I am moving to Italy. But I’m glad I read this article which gave me ideas of how to earn in Italy. Do you think making a small brand of tropical accessories like necklace and anklets made of beads and selling them in Italy would be a good idea to add up to the income I’d be earning in Italy? I’d appreciate your opinion.

    1. Hey Beatriz – That’s hard to say as it involves so many different factors and a great deal of work to get started. You need to do some market research, find out if people are looking for the kind of products you want to sell and on and on. I wouldn’t just start creating a brand without knowing if there is a high chance of it working first. And all that requires to find out is research, research, research!

  136. Hey Earl,

    Thanks so much for this article, it was really helpful and made me a little more optimistic that I just might be able to live the life I’ve been dreaming of (at least for a little while).
    I am really interested in working as a resort desk/host, or even as a waitress/bartender, or a type of tour guide for cruise/travel excursions. What sites/resources would you suggest for me to look into to be able to get some sort of work planned out before I hop on a plane to who knows where?

    Thanks!
    Kim

    1. Hey Kim – Thanks for the comment! There really isn’t any good sites that will lead to such jobs. To find this kind of work, you really need to network once you arrive in your destination and start contacting resorts, bars, restaurants, cafes, etc. once there. These just aren’t the kind of positions that are advertised online. As scary as that may seem, if you are determined to find a job and are able to talk to people, you should find opportunities in many parts of the world!

  137. Earl. You cannot simply teach English abroad. Of all the countries you list, they require at LEAST a BA degree and a TEFL. Most jobs require an MA, and some years teaching abroad.

    You also fail to mention how one goes about getting incredibly hard work visas that Americans with MAs cannot get. Yet somehow you get them without a degree or experience. Another thing is, you get work visa for unskilled jobs. Unskilled jobs generally do not have a visa scheme.

    WHV is another thing. Americans, and most nationals, do not qualify for this visa. It is impossible that you got one.

    1. Hey Jack – You might want to read my post on how I taught English in Thailand first: https://www.wanderingearl.com/how-to-fund-your-travels-with-creativity/

      And also, I do know Americans who have managed to get a job teaching English without a BA degree and plenty who have managed to get a job without a TEFL. Yes, a MA degree is needed in general if you plan to teach English at a university or private high school, but for teaching jobs at language schools, definitely not.

      As for work visas, you get a work permit once you get hired as a teacher. I do not state anywhere that I received a work visa myself as the jobs I’ve done did not require one. And I mention many times on this blog that you get work visas once you get hired (apart from holiday working visas that one can get without having secured a job) and that it is not possible to get a work visa without having a job already secured.

  138. To be a new nomad, is not so easy, many countries don’t allow you to work there. I think the best option is remote work, but in order to do this you have to study in domain such IT.

    There is a growing paranoid about “others stealing your job”.

    This is due to technological unemployment. I won’t get deeper in this argument but automation and robotics are changing the current paradigm. Although I’m not at all a luddist, I wonder how society can handle those changes without people becoming more and more paranoid, more and more pretending to close themselves in the “nation-state prison”.

    I forgot to mention, I’m from Italy and currently living in France, looking after to going back to study, priority to careers that allows to work remotely with your own pc.

    Yes, the best is not to find a new job everytime you visit a new country, the best option and the easiest is to build a carreer and then take your job with you.

    At age 29, you look for financial (relative) stability not look for job adventures that can’t end up badly sometimes.

    Remote working, would be great to focus on it.

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  140. Hey Earl, I read your article and I think its really great because I’ve been wondering how I can be a backpacker and survive at the same time. Your post gives me so many options but I have a problem and I was hoping you could help me out…I was thinking I could be an ESL teacher but I’m not a native English speaker and I heard that you need to be one if you want to be an ESL teacher. Is this the case and if so what can I do about it? I’m from Sri Lanka..

    1. Hey Akeed – In general, you would be required to be a native English speaker to get a job teaching English. Some exceptions might be if you have studied English at university, have some type of advanced certification in English, etc. It’s still possible to find work even without all of that, but it’s definitely much, much more difficult.

  141. I’m 22. Got two buddies. With me on this adventure.2 of us left behind 6 digit jobs. We have my car and are trying to figure out a way to use it as a courier service. So we. Can go from place to place. Let me no if u have ANY ideas thx or advice

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  143. I’m 19 and I’m from India, I have no experience in any kind of field, I have anxiety about leaving home and i’ve always wanted to travel the world
    I’ve hardly got much of a
    financial income I might have to
    save some money to start my trip off, but
    travelling and earning money for me is better option can you suggest me any kind of courses, which help to perceive my dream’s and make income of it.

    1. Hey Lucky – My best advice is to keep looking at travel blogs and learning how other people are making it happen. Everyone who is traveling has managed to achieve their goals in their own way because there are endless ways to make traveling a reality. And the more you read about it, the more confidence you’ll gain and the more ideas you’ll have as to how you can make it happen as well!

  144. Hey Earl

    Thanks for the list. I’ve been interested in going to New Zealand or Australia through the work holiday scheme thing. I’m a bit skeptical going through these programs the travel agencies are offering like a start-off thing though. I really want to travel abroad and willing to work to fund my future adventures but I’m a bit apprehensive on how to even start. A few words of advice from you would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

    1. Hey Norman – My advice is to simply apply for the working holiday visa on your own through the Australian or NZ immigration website and not use an agency. There is no reason to use the agency. You can get the visa yourself, travel to Australia or NZ and find a job on your own. I have friends who went this method and they saved a lot of money and managed without any problems at all.

      1. I am currently doing a working holiday in Ireland through a program. It was not at all worth the money. The only benefits are they made the process easier, taught me about taxes, and I can use the printer at the office (if the office is open). They charged me more than I believe the program was worth, because it would not have been terribly difficult to figure out all this information on my own.

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  146. I would need some ideas I am only 17 and I am from Slovenia. I would really like to go somewhere for the summer holidays on low budget like last year I went to Portugal to surf but it wasn’t exactly on low budget and also do you know if you even can travel alone to other countries if you are under 18?

    1. @Mister X – I think that in order to travel when you are under 18, you need a notarized letter of consent from your parents that you must carry with you.

  147. Earl!!! Why isn’t this page in a big neon flashing banner on top of your website???
    I swear! If I ever meet you out in the big world I will run after you like a fat kid runs after the ice cream truck!
    Awesome post! Thank you!

  148. Lots of great ideas to keep the money coming in while travelling, I’m 22 and I have little retail experience, I have anxiety about leaving home and I’ll admit, I have a little social anxiety. i pretty much have generalized anxiety it comes in many forms but I’ve always wanted to travel the world since I was a child I used to take my friends with me on long adventures to places far even for kids, I still want to travel now, I’ve hardly got much of a financial income I’m on benefits, I might have to save some money to start my trip off, but travelling and earning money for me is better than benefits and you earn it 🙂

    How do you guarantee you’ll make money travelling, how will you know where to go so you don’t get lost, what if you run out of money ? what if you have no where to stay ? who can you turn to for help ? all these questions pop up for me.. pretty much all the “risks” associated with travelling. id like to know your thoughts on this please it will make so much difference getting a response from an experienced traveller, thank you in advance, much appreciated. happy travelling people 🙂

    1. Hey Stephen – My thoughts are simple, either ignore those questions or else it will be quite difficult to get out there and travel. First, there are never any guarantees but at the same time, what’s wrong with getting lost? What’s wrong with turning to locals and asking for assistance if you need it? Besides, you can always find a place to stay – hostels, couchsurfing.org, guesthouses, work exchange programs and on and on. As for money, it’s up to you…to earn money overseas you often need determination and a bunch of creativity but at the same time, there are thousands of people out there making it happen, so it’s a realistic goal. You could always teach English as well. Travel is all about going into the unknown, finding your way and learning in the process so in the end, having those questions answered up front, won’t do you any good…you’ll just have to take the first step and enjoy the adventure.

      1. I have to agree with Earl. I’m learning that discovering how you will travel, piecing everything together one day at a time, usually through a lot of preparation and research is the whole point. If there were a cut and dry method for traveling the world as a globetrotter, not a tourist, everyone would be doing it 🙂

  149. I have been thinking about teaching ESL in several countries. I am American, and I will be finishing my undergrad soon, and instead of going straight back to school for a masters, I figured, why not find a way to travel abroad and make enough money to explore without being a tourist. I have family in Brasil, and friends in Sweden and Romania, and I think I would do quiet well as a native English speaker. Obviously I am fluent, and have many English courses under my belt, but how does one contact private/university level schools regarding English positions. For example, in Romania, I would essentially need a job offer before I could even apply for a work visa. Is It common for travelers teaching esl to have a certification of some sort in that line of work?

    I am excellent with languages, and speak 2 fluently, and find picking up romance languages to be very easy, so I don’t think I will have a problem fitting in. I’m just stuck at this point with how to connect the dots from the USA to Europe. Any suggestions would be much appreciated.

    My email is [email protected] if anyone would like to chat and exchange ideas and information.

    Much love from the US.

    Drew

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  151. Thanks for this 🙂 Gave me the boost in confidence i needed to start my backpacking trip, there are soo many ways to earn money, as long as you’re creative and like an adventure. I’m super excited to try some of these out !

  152. Hey Marie, that is exactly what I was thinking too, that I would love to do that being a teacher in ESL. Was not sure how to look into that but I guess as you said you could just ask them straight up. Other great ideas too.

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  154. Hello Earl

    Fantastic blog. What a great adventure.
    I’m thinking of finding work as crew on private boats/yachts and working on cruise ships to save up and travel and wondered if you knew where I could start with finding such positions. Of course I’ve looked on websites but they all seem to require experience working in 5* hotels/restaurants etc. Should I be looking into training of some sort?

  155. Hi heena,

    Just came across this blog post and it’s interesting to see another dentist in making like me, planning to travel the world ‘Earl style’…I thought if I am the only one with such crazy ideas….

    Cheers!!
    Anuj

  156. Hi Earl !
    Thanks for all your advices ! It’s really inspiring and nice to see we are so many with the same mind-set ! I’m actually leaving in 8 days for Latine Amerca, without any return date. I always enjoyed travel, and I arrived at a point I just needed to really live it ! So let’s go !

    The point is that I’m pretty much in the situation your were when you first left (a few amount of money, but clearly not enough for the no-return trip I’m planning). All your tips are great but I’ve got a question : legally speaking, how does it work ? I guess main “local” jobs are done under the table (sorry I’m french so I dunno the exact expression in english ^^’, but to resume it : illegally). Have you ever had troubles with authorities and all ? What about hostels jobs for example : are they regarding on the legal aspects ? What about the cruise works ? Since it’s delocalized, is it legal ? It would be a shame to get caught and that the adventure end up on such a bad touch (though I would be away again soon enough !)

    1. Hey Liza – Congrats on your upcoming trip and I truly wish you nothing but a wonderful adventure ahead! As for work, yes, some jobs would be paid under the table and others would allow you to get a working permit depending on the country you’re in. I’ve never had trouble with authorities but you do need to be careful of course. Cruise ship employment is official so it’s perfectly legal as you would have all the paperwork and permits you need to work on a ship that visits different countries. Working in a hostel is usually under the table but in many countries, it’s just an exchange of room and board for a few hours of work, so the authorities probably aren’t going to care too much.

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  158. I smiled when I saw #38: Edit English Signs/Menus. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen mistakes in menus or signs overseas, especially in Asia. But since these were not rich countries, I always assumed nobody would want to pay me to fix their errors. Especially if this meant having to reprint all their menus! However, I may try it next time. 🙂

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  160. Absolutely love your post!gave me a lot of amazing ideas.i had a few questions in mind,it’ll be really nice of you to answer.I will complete dentistry in this year, I’m from India.dentistry is a great paying job but my first love will always be traveling. So I wanted to ask you if I being from india have english as a second language so how are my chances of landing a job as an English teacher in a country like Italy since I’m not a native english speaker. Also,are there any options for dentists?

  161. Great post Earl you really cover all the bases!
    I had good success with remote work and online freelancing, I think its really a matter of experiment and findint out what works for you.

  162. Hi!
    This article was so amazing to me.
    I’m in college and I’m still trying to figure out if it’s the right place for me. All I want to do is spend whatever time here that I have seeing what there is to see and spending time with the ones that I love, and sometimes I feel like being here at college is holding me back because I don’t want to just spend my time waiting to do what I’d like to. I was wondering how much, if any, college experience is necessary for some of these jobs?
    Like if I wanted to work at a resort or sell time shares or any of these things and make a living, would I need to have a full four years of college?
    Thank you!

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  164. Woww!! That’s quite a lot. I’ll stick with my online freelancing and make my budding travel blog as source of my passive income. Really hope to earn a lot from my blogging but I know it would take time. Thanks for this list. Very helpful. (:

  165. What an inspiration!! It’s reassuring to know that my travel dreams are actually attainable. Feeling hopeful…Thanks Earl! 🙂

  166. Awesome. Could you please give some details about Sell Timeshares? How could I find a job? I’m Italian, and I speak English and German. I have no idea where to look. Thank you. Keep going mate

    1. Hey Gian – You just need to look for ‘resort jobs’ on the internet in some of the more popular resort destinations around the world (Mexico, Greece, Thailand, etc.) and you should see such jobs listed on those kind of employment websites. Or you can simply find out which resorts in those places have timeshares (which isn’t hard to do) and you can go directly to their websites to see if they have any job openings.

  167. I’m a nurse and would love to leave the hospital for anything else . I have a wandering spirit and a need to travel now not when I retire. I like your Ideas but most are for younger folks, I’m 50. I need portable work. Something I can do from a computer and that travels well. I don’t mind going back to school to learn a few needed skills. Any Ideas.

  168. Just so you know, in some countries (like Thailand) it’s illegal to do any type of work without a work permit, even online work for companies/people in other countries. You can be put in jail if they catch you, and they’ve done it before. If you’re going to be working while in another country, check the rules, and if it’s illegal just tell people you saved up enough money to travel for a while. It’s best not to make it too known how you’re making money.

  169. I can say that working at a resort is a great idea even if all you are wanting to do is travel around the country rather than the world. Or at least start out slow maybe for logistical reasons. My experience was that I was dating someone who recently had to move back to his hometown, and we were stuck as to what to do because the long-distance thing wasn’t for us. Eventually the job that I had at the time laid me off (this was in 2008 and I was working in one of those retail stores that went under during that year). So we got together and he told me of a time he had worked in a lodge up north in the sawtooth mountains. We were both strapped for cash, and figured this would be a fun way to solve both our problems, we could both work together and live together. It was a very memorable time. We did it in the winter in a place that when it snowed, it really snowed. We even had cars that were totally worthless in the snow, but we made it work. We ate from the lodge most of the time, lived in basically hotel rooms from another lodge that went under and was bought by the owners who hired us. We met lots of interesting people, and got to ride on snowmobiles for free as often as we wanted (because that’s what the lodge offered in the winter). Sometimes we saw grey wolves, and this was a place where people came here with bucket loads of money to live here as their vacation home. And there were no cities within a 50-100 mile radius. And guess what? I made MORE there than I did if I had stayed at my old job anyways, plus I didn’t have to pay rent or utilities. And we were both butt broke when we started too. The biggest cost was gas, but that was fine. Plus, even though I was working more hours than my previous job, it really didn’t feel like work as much because the people I was working with, I was also living with and eventually it all just sort of felt like a family rather than some corporate faceless interaction you can often get when working at many retail places. Now, say if I had worked there sans the boyfriend I probably would have stayed there longer… but… heh, that’s life. (Turns out your early 20s are sometimes not the best time to decide to live and work constantly with a boyfriend in a remote location in the mountains in the dead of winter) But despite that, I got a taste of freedom, and a kind of life I know now I really want to do again. After that I also worked for a ski lodge in the city my parents live in, which was fun too. Those kinds of places always have such a nicer atmosphere where people actually ENJOY coming to work rather than dreading it…. well… most times anyways. And I got to try out snowboarding for free. Turns out… no… not for me… not at all… not even close. Fun though to try! And I think its important for people to realize that travel doesn’t have to start thousands of miles away, and new adventures can start just outside your back door. I’m lucky that I live in the northwest where there are lots of camping and national parks/state parks and so on. But maybe our attitudes should change from, I want to visit yellowstone, or I want to go on a cruise, to… I want to work for yellowstone, and I want to work on a cruise ship. Most of these things are seasonal anyways. And the best part is that you get the better experience for it because you get to stay longer, and you learn stuff that the tourists never usually stick around to discover. Sorry this was such a long reply, but I wanted to share my story 🙂

  170. This article is fantastic, and really helps reassure me that the structure of our world is not as rigid as the one we’re taught. This has gotten me excited about working on my blog and expanding my capabilities as a photographer, and I had to throw a little honorable mention your way for that. Thank you for the ideas and inspiration!

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  172. Welldone,fella!I have made up my mind to start my own travel and I’m searching the web for good pieces of advise.Your blog is wonderfull!I’m Iranian and I hope someday I’ll meet you here.You’re welcome whenever you want to travel to Iran.Keep going Earl!Good luck and May the Force be with you!

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  174. Great post! My sister is a nurse, and she did “travel nursing” for a few years. She worked for an agency that found jobs for her in different cities in the U.S. Each job lasted at least 3 months, and sometimes longer. The hospitals needed someone temporarily or were desperate for nurses. She got to live in some great cities and really get to know them. I would imagine there might be opportunities to do this internationally, too, and in other fields.

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  176. Another way is to become a social media community manager. 🙂 I manage Twitter, Facebook and Instagram accounts on the side. You just need to be online at a certain time of the day and answer all online inquiries.

  177. I truly wonderful article here! I know of many people who have travelled extensively due to parental contacts and associations with Christian groups etc, but have been at a bit of a loose end when it comes to ME travelling. Finance is my number one concern on the matter. It’s extremely reassuring for me to see how easy it can actually be to earn AND travel. I’m so eager to get out beyond Europe I’m not sure I can even manage to finish my degree. Four more years of that left.

  178. It’s amazing how many ways you can make money while travelling! That’s insane how easy it is to be in a Bollywood film, it would be so much fun AND you get paid! What could possibly be better? Fruit picking sounds pretty fun, too. All of them sound great, to be honest. I can’t imagine why someone would want to sit in an office building all day rather than doing one of these and being able to travel!

  179. The idea about editing English signs was pretty cool. Do you know how the guy you met advertised his services, whether he went up to the various shops that needed help and got the word around or some other way?

    Also, thanks for the list. I definitely hadn’t thought of a bunch of these. 🙂

    1. Hey Mic – Yes, he just went into the shops/restaurants/etc, explained what he could offer and made a pitch!

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  181. Thank you for this post. I love travelling, and my biggest downfall is how to do it now; going to all the places I want to go, when I’m young rather than in 10 years. Although some of these points I’ve known about, it’s so incredibly encouraging to read it from someone doing it; and not someone who through together a list of qualified jobs. (because working to travel abroad, and working abroad are two entirely different things!) Thank you for this! I appreciate it! I am working on a blog at the moment and I am curious; what blog websites do you reccomond? Currently I have wordpress but I’m not sure what’s the best for directing traffic, customization and pricing.

    Thanks again!

    Cheers

    Jones

    1. Hey Jones – I would definitely recommend using WordPress.org and choosing a premium theme that meets your needs. It’s customizable and definitely a great platform to use.

  182. I’ve done at least 5 of these jobs 🙂

    Started out as a teacher in Thailand but then stayed on as a freelance writer. Having Bangkok as a base is amazing as there are so many places to get to easily from here. I’d highly recommend it to anyone not quite sure where to start or where to stay.

    BTW, awesome website. I read you often.

    1. Anyone mind explaining how to stay in a country for more then 3 months without a visa? It sounds like most people are in extended stays, but I’m not sure how they set up a home base in country.

      1. Hey Kevin – It depends on the rules of each country, as well as your citizenship, but in general, there are many countries where you can stay more than 3 months.

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  187. Excellent tips! Another way you can do it (although its not very consistant) is signing up to be a mstery shopper. You get emailed assingments to do and you report back online, I earned £11.50 just for going into a corner shop and asking where the eggs were.

    I think its important to know what your strengths are, and what skills you can transfer to other places e.g. I dj and I am planning to find jobs abroad, even if it is in a Scottish/Irish pub.

    Thanks for writing this post, its given me lots of ideas!

    1. a mistery shopper??? where did you find that job?? tell more, please, i’m really curious and it sounds quite exciting!

  188. This is one of the best lists I’ve seen on earning income to travel. It’s nice that there’s some options on there that aren’t just for singles too. As a family with kids we’d definitely be able to take advantage of some of the items on your list. Thanks a bunch for putting it together!

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  190. Great list! I never thought about editing English signs/menus etc. I have done quite a few of these and it’s amazing how your mind is opened up after seeing all the possibilities of making money whether at home or abroad. It’s so freeing!

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  193. Excellent resource! I’ve written a few of these type of posts for finance sites, yet there are still quite a few there I didn’t think of… thanks. I’ll be hitting up some businesses with bad/no websites soon. Great idea!

  194. I really like the idea of hopping to different countries and enjoying the journeys while at the same time learning about the people and culture. Thank you for sharing your tips. I think I’ll start with improving my travel blog to help me in my travel expenses.

  195. Don’t forget http://www.tefl.com for even more English teaching jobs, though they almost always require qualifications. I also really like the editing English menus/signs idea; there are really so many places that need it; I’ve come across many nonsensical menu translations even in Western Europe, not to mention China or anywhere else in Asia.

    Thanks for putting this together, Earl! It’s really encouraging to think of all the ways to earn money without necessarily having to have a knack at SEO or online marketing!

  196. This is an amazing list. Currently studying abroad in Denmark as a type 1 diabetic. Traveling around the world has some difficulties, but it worth the experience. You are inspirational. After my education may be traveling forever.

  197. Thanks for this list. We are a family of 4 that started out to take a career break in Spain for 12-24 months and see a bit of Europe too. Nearly 6 months into this, we realize we want to go as long as possible, but will need to bring in an income. This is helpful to get the mind spinning…. thanks!

    1. Hey Heidi – Most people do need an income to survive out there but luckily there are options. And if you really want to travel for as long as possible, I have no doubt you will all find a way to make it a reality.

  198. Thanks for this post! It looks much smarter than a strategy to “sell the house and the car first, spend all the money on traveling and…what next? Well, I’ll think about it when the money is over.”

    In the fifties of the last century there was a famous Swiss traveler Nicolas Bouvier who went from Switzerland to India by car. It took him almost 2 years and he was working while traveling. He wrote amazing books about traveling and the way he spend this time. Highly recommended!

    1. Hey Agata – I have heard of Nicolas Bouvier as I think another travel blogger write about him somewhat recently. I haven’t read his books though so I shall check them out…thanks!

  199. Great list! I’d compiled a list of ways to make money while traveling in my post Make Money Traveling – Earn Anywhere and though I don’t have quite as extensive list as you do, I talk about a few you didn’t include.

    I’m leaving to begin my nomadic life of traveling the world at the beginning of April and finding a way to make enough money to survive has been extremely important to me.

    My primary focus right now is generating passive or residual income because it can continue to earn you royalties while your away traveling and for the rest of your life.

    Most of my effort thus far has gone into self publishing my fiction writing and it’s finally starting to pay off. Today I had my first $50+ day in earned royalties between Barns and Noble and Amazon and I’m hoping to to break $500 for the month.

    Since I’m starting in SEAsia, I’m nearing the threshold for being able to sustain my travels in that region and if I keep working at it I’m sure I’ll be earning enough to travel the rest of the world.
    -Wil

  200. Really great post Earl. I think for those who dream of travelling the world and have yet to do it, finances are the single biggest hurdle out there. Giving up stable income for uncertainly. Your advice here is proof that where there’s a will, there’s a way.

    Personally, I like the idea of freelancing – a skill and a laptop is all that’s required! I know someone who runs their own business and while he technically lives in Melbourne, he spends at least half of the year abroad – meeting with clients and working from overseas bases. He doesn’t fall into the trap of taking on too much work (many spend time overseas in offices and hotel rooms) and I’d say spends half of the time he is overseas doing travel related stuff that he wants to do.

    There’s always a way to make it happen if you want to. I hope people realise that.

    1. Hey Paul – Freelancing sure is a great option and people don’t realize that such a variety of skills/knowledge are in demand. Freelancing isn’t restricted to just a couple of job types, it’s an entire world of opportunities.

  201. Nice list Earl! I have done quite a lot of them.

    Just yesterday I finished my 7th Wwoof.

    I worked as a cleaner in a hostel for a month (here is my post about it: https://everydaynomad.com/you-can-be-a-cleaner-too-working-for-accommodation-in-a-hostel/).

    I have house-sat as part of Wwoofing, hoping to do it as an actual house sit only soon.

    I have been an extra on adverts and TV shows.

    I earn money from blogging (not from my travel site at present).

    I am a graphic and web designer so have clients in this area.

    I’m definitely interested in crewing a Yacht one day too and am going to give your cruise ship book a read some time.

    1. Hey Forest – I read your post about being a cleaner in a hostel and it’s an option that does save a lot of money. Seems like you sure have done quite a few things on the list and I’ll be curious to see what is next for you 🙂

  202. I’ve correct English signs & menu’s before, sort of fell into it by chance. I was in Chile, sitting in a restaurant and noticed they’d written “travelers welcome” as “travelers not welcome” and told the restaurant owner. They ended up asking me to correct their menu and told their business owner friends. I ended up making around $600 dollars in a couple of weeks just doing that.

      1. I find it funny that I misused the word “corrected” in comment about correcting grammar. I promise I do have a degree in English, lol.

  203. I just bumped into your blog while surfing. I am an Indian. It is nice to know that you had been to India too. Your methods to earn while you travel are interesting though I doubt I would ever be able to do so. Shy and reserved as I am, I prefer confinement to my comfort zone but I appreciate the way you have moulded your life as you desire it to be like. About traveling, there is an Urdu couplet:

    “Sair kar duniya ki gafil zindgani phir kahan
    Zindagani gar rahi to naujawani phir kahan.”

    It means:

    Travel o’ mortal aging human being travel … for you will not have another life … and even if you have life …this young life will not be there forever …so travel.

    Keep traveling!

    Ajay

    1. Hey Ajay – Thank you for sharing that Urdu piece and it is something that I can relate to, and that many people can understand I’m sure. And thanks for reading…I hope you’ll stick around!

  204. Steve,

    I’m lucky in that my stuff rooms with my parents while I’m gone. Still, a lot of people stick it in storage, just rent a cube or whatever. It’s a cost, but a worthwhile one if your things are important to you. Or farm it out to friends… I’ve done that as well, when I studied abroad.

    As far as finding PA work, I’d recommend you check out Elance and Odesk… they might not net you a ton of work but they are good places to start!

  205. Thanks for the info, my cousin is actually working at a cruise ship. He’s an avid traveler and totally loves his job. However, he told me it gets lonely whenever he’s on the 6 months tour.

    1. Hey Jam – It depends on the person I guess. I loved it because I never felt lonely, always being surrounded by new people, both crew members and passengers. But some people don’t enjoy spending a good portion of their time on board a ship for such long periods, which is perfectly understandable!

  206. Great list, and some really good ideas. I especially love the haircut idea and can’t believe I never thought of it before! (I was a hairstylist for 17 years).
    Promoting tours for commission is a good one too. I could easily do that while having a beer at the beach. 😉

  207. Good post, Earl! It proves that the opportunities for making money overseas are nearly endless as long as you’re – quoting your favourite word – creative!

    At this moment I’m staying in China and guess what? I recently got employed by a model agency catering for fashion shows, club nights, store openings an other events which need the handsome (at least handsome in the eyes of Chinese!) foreign faces for promotion purposes. In such job it is possible to get the equivalent of 160USD just for 3 hours of standing (with long breaks) dressed in a suit and smiling in the club lobby, while the rich Chinese customers want to have a photo with you! Easy, funny, pleasant and well-paid, I’d say. Makes you feel like a superstar! With 4-5 such assignments a month, it is possible to live on a decent level. I recently wrote a post about how much I do personally spend, if you and anyone else’s curious:

    https://www.jauntytom.com/howmuch-does-it-cost-to-live-in-chengdu/

    Combine it with a part-time teaching job and you can actually save a quite nice sum!

    China is full of stories of foreigners who ended up doing sth here which they would never do in their home countries for a variety of reasons. And I’m sure it applies to plenty of other countries too. Your Bollywood experience is one such example!

    1. @JauntyTom – That’s very creative and I had not heard of people doing that before. Great option though and I might have to try that out myself one of these days!

  208. Great list Earl! 🙂

    In addition to teaching a language, I’d also add teaching at an international school (as I do). You get to live in another country (usually with your housing paid for), get paid a salary that’s typically equal to or higher than what you’d receive in your home country, and if you’re especially lucky you’ll get to travel further chaperoning school trips. I teach in Korea and I’m heading to China for the second time next month.

    To get into teaching at an international school, you generally need to be certified to teach in your home country and have two years of experience under your belt, but this varies by country and school.

    1. Hey Owen – Thanks for sharing and such a position is definitely one to consider for those who are qualified. I have a friend doing the same thing in Istanbul and she’s ended up staying there for about 8 years so far.

  209. Earl,

    Great list! I like how you stress the creativity part. I have a couple ideas from this list I’m trying to combine together!

    Will

    1. Hey Will – Keep me updated with any ideas you use while out there. I want to know how it turns out and how your travels are going.

    1. Hey Osvaldo – It really depends on the country and the resort. Sometimes they will sponsor your work visa for you, other times they will pay you under the table. And on some occasions, you’ll have to get the work permit on your own once they hire you. In most countries it’s difficult to get a work visa without having an official job offer, but once you have the offer, the process becomes easier.

  210. Great list! I think when people consider traveling, they may get too narrow in their thinking about the opportunities that are out there. I may try a couple of these that I hadn’t really sought out.

    I should try that travel blogging thing too! 😉

    1. Hey Jeremy – And I can understand why people think so narrowly. It’s hard to think ‘outside the box’ when you spend so much time at home following the same routine and the same set of rules. That’s why the more travelers we communicate with, the more ideas we get and the easier it becomes to break out of that pattern.

  211. Good list Earl, some of it anyway.I read about 3 travel sites and yours is the best one I read.This is something I have never seen writen about and should be.Beats picking friut in the hot sun. Why don’t you find a friend that works for a major airline in the US. There are 1000’s and they get great benifits that you can get also if you can get them to put you on there friend’s and familly list.I’m on United, Delta, and Southwest just gives free blank ticket’s. The cost anywhere in the US is free and international I’ve never paid more than 25.00. Then you have the hotel’s up to 90% off.So next time you are on a plane talk to the oldest flight att. you can find and tell her about your blog. I say oldest because they board the free passengers by the employee’s seniority.The only downside is you will get stuck somewhere sooner or later.

    1. Hey Ken – That is a good topic. I have a friend who is a pilot for Virgin Blue and was on her list for a year while in Australia at one point. That was great of course and led to a good amount of money saved. Haven’t thought about finding someone who works for an airline since though…maybe I should, and then write about it.

  212. Poker, both online and live at casinos is a possibility … like travel blogging, only a small percentage can be profitable at it. Some people may think that it is like table games at a casino, where the odds are ultimately in the house’s favour. But poker is played against other people (the house takes a small % of each pot, often capped at a set amount to make $$$ off the enterprise), and as such, as long as you get it in with the best of it, charge players that are likely drawing, and avoid paying off your opponent when you are likely beat, it is possible to show a profit in the long term.

    Just don’t dive in without learning the basics first, have a proper bankroll (>$4000 for Live 1/2, but as little as $500 can get you started online at stakes as low as .10/.25), and NEVER PLAY WITH $$$ YOU CAN’T AFFORD TO LOSE.

    Great article Earl, keep’em coming! 🙂

    1. Hey James – Thanks for adding that to the list as well. I didn’t think of that option but I do know a couple of people who fund their travels, at least partly, with online poker. And good advice at the end…this income option must be taken seriously and is not something to throw all of your money into.

  213. It is amazing to know that there are plenty of possibilities to earn while traveling! I personally find it so much easier to do restaurant and bar works, although the work load can be tough and the pay can be rather low, it is fun and it do fund my travels little by little as time pass by. I might try to check out some of the other options you list down and see which can serve me best. Thanks for the advises! Evan.

  214. Can’t wait for your list of how to make money right when you come back from travels… Or even better, 42 good reasons why you never should go back home after travelling.

    Btw. If you need a haircut, just give me a shout ;-).

  215. Top list Earl.

    Working Holiday Visas have been our best strategy for basing ourselves in a region, earning the local currency, and then exploring. It’s such a great way to “slow travel” and really get to know a culture and it’s people. We’re too old now, most cut off at 30yrs, but loved our time in London and Dublin.

    Also, my wife’s teaching degree has been GOLD in allowing us to live and work in the States and Thailand. And for me my construction background helped a ton as well. So use what you have at your disposal.

    P.S… we have suffered through many a Time Share presentation in Florida, so head that way if it peaks your interest 🙂

    1. Hey Craig – That is definitely a wise strategy and one that will keep anyone on the road for a longer period of time. As for the timeshare gig, I couldn’t do it myself at all but for some people who thrive in that selling environment, it may be an ideal position. I’ve so far avoided such presentations!

  216. Oh Earl, you are the best, what a wonderful article with great resources. In fact, I didn’t had a fixed employment since 2008, I’m a freelancer for life. I’m absolutely convinced that there is always work if you’re just ready to try something new and risk something. I use to work as a freelance screen designer from time to time as it pays very well, but in between I teach German. Just put ads up on CraigsList and interested people will call. I even teach German on Skype, they are surprisingly a lot of schools offering this service and I can do this job everywhere where I have a good internet connection. I would add Craigslist.com to your list of resources, it’s always worth to have a look at the job section. I love being a freelancer and having the freedom to work whenever I want to.

    1. Hey Sab – Craigslist is a great resource. And it just shows that something as simple as placing an ad or two on that site, offering some kind of service, just might be enough to get some work while overseas.

  217. Thanks for this Earl! If you dream it you can do it… but you have to actually get up and do it! It’s easy to just read all the articles and say “someday”… After two years of job hunting here, I’m waiting to hear back about an application I’ve sent in to teach in France, but if that doesn’t work out, I’m committed to heading out somewhere, either teaching in Asia or working holiday-ing down South. It’s been hard to take the leap, but based on my past experience the leap is the hardest part… once you’re going it’s easy to keep going!

  218. AWESOME!!! Thank you so much for the list man! It really helped! I’m moving to London in September (From Australia) so I will definitely refer back to this!
    Also, another few things you might want to add for creative people, is to sell photography/clothing designs on sites like Red Bubble, Society6 and MySoti.
    I make anywhere from $80 to $200 a month for doing nothing! I plan on building this up as much as I can!
    Thanks again man.

    1. Hey Graeme – Great stuff and definitely some good options for selling certain things online. And there are many more similar sites out there as well that make it easy to get your products/photos in front of the right people.

  219. You can add “join the Peace Corps” to that list. You get a free ticket to a place that’s expensive to get to otherwise (like Africa or the South Pacific), a modest income while you volunteer, and a couple of thousand dollars of “readjustment allowance” when you finish. A lot of volunteer use that lump sum to travel long term after finishing their service. You have to be an American citizen to join the Peace Corps.

  220. Hey Earl,

    I love your posts, and you’re one of my top inspiration to travel around the world! Thanks for this post I was really in need for some advice on different ways to earn money and travel.
    Hope to try out some of those ideas and I’ll give you a feedback on how it goes along!

    1. Hey Kevin – Definitely let us know how it goes. I’m sure your story will be inspirational to others once you get started!

  221. This post just made my day! This just may be the most important post you’ve ever written for some of your followers. As I’m a hopeless and forever “List Maker”, do you think there’s a way to make a buck making lists?

    1. Hey Steve!

      Listmaking is a great skill, and you could always work as a professional/ personal organizer for people… personal assistant type work! There’s a need for that everywhere and you can do a lot of it virtually.

      1. Thanks Ellen. I’ve bookmarked your website and now you are on my list! Ha Ha However, even if you make it sound like this may be an easy thing to do, it is so far “outside the box” I wouldn’t have the slightest idea where to start looking. Maybe it’s time to explore a tangent as I too have been out of work for two years. I’d be off traveling like Earl, but I’ve got to get rid of or find a (inside the box) place for my “Stuff”.

        Thanks again for your encouragement.

  222. great one earl…i’ll go on working holiday to australia this june and plan to apply for 9-5 office job there (because the pay is better than seasonal jobs & would be good for my professional resume too). I met other traveler who did this last time and she said I can try to look for ‘maternity cover’ jobs which usually wants people to work between 4-12 months. Wish me luck! 🙂

    1. Hey Karima – That’s the thing with the working holiday visa to Australia…you can get a high-paying office job as well, which will certainly give anyone’s bank account a boost and allow for some future traveling as well. I do wish you luck and please let us know how it goes!

  223. well done, Earl!
    We have recently compiled 100+ resources to travel for free. Lots of yours are also in the list. If you want, stop by and leave your link in the comments. Our aim is to increase it with more ideas to inspire travelers. Thanks 🙂

  224. I’ve also seen people selling food on the beach. Many beach towns have absolutely no convenience/”to-go” food and tourists rarely pack themselves picnics or lunch. At one of my favorite beaches in Costa Rica there are often travelers walking up and down the beach selling homemade sweets and sandwiches. I had this idea to start selling cut up fruit on the beach in Costa Rica after seeing it EVERYWHERE in Colombia but never followed through. Hope you don’t mind if I share a link to an article I wrote on funding travel? https://thisamericangirl.com/2013/01/11/how-to-fund-long-term-travel/

  225. I’m glad to see you included the corporate world (even though corporate sounds like an ugly word) — too many people don’t think it’s possible to travel and have a career-building job at the same time, when it totally is. I’ve worked on a reality television show in Singapore, at a tech start-up in Shanghai, and as a sports journalist in London, and now I’m based in Paris. My career’s so much further along thanks to finding jobs abroad (I graduated in 2010) than it would have been if I’d stayed in the States!

    1. I completely agree! There are great ways to work in the travel industry, have a steady paycheck and enjoy advancing in your career – all while you see the world.

    2. Hey Edna – That’s great to hear that you’ve had so much success. And it is true, such ‘real’ jobs are an option worth exploring, especially for those who really have an interest in a specific field.

  226. Classic tips on how to make money and travel the world at the same time. Very interesting about the acting in films. You might be able to get a role in Bollywood who knows. Interesting stuff.

    1. Hey Shalu – It’s actually incredibly easy for foreigners to get a Bollywood role. Every time I’ve been to Mumbai I’ve been asked if I want to act and most other travelers I know who have been there, have had the exact same experience. Five minutes of walking around Colaba is often all it takes!

  227. Love it! There are certainly a lot of options. Above all else though…you have to really want to make it work to truly succeed. If you try any of these half-hearted, you won’t have very much success.

    1. @Conway Training – Agreed. It certainly does take a good amount of dedication and effort to make most of these options a reality.

  228. Great ideas Earl!

    It’s quite amazing the amount of possibilities that can just keep you traveling. None will likely earn someone a fortune or even a savings account but it can keep you going and seeing the world for a long time.

    1. Hey Matthew – Very true, earning a fortune while traveling is not easy, but earning enough to travel and also save some money, is definitely possible.

  229. Suggesting under the table construction work can be dangerous Earl. You have no recourse or rights if injured on a job site, which ain’t fun in a foreign country.

    You have a big platform and audience mate, but think a bit though about what you suggest sometimes…

    1. Hey John – I’m just stating what is out there to give people ideas. And not all construction work involves risky work which is why it can be a good option for the right people. At the same time, you could probably find something ‘risky’ about most of the jobs above as I doubt that a hostel or cafe would help you out if you got injured either. Heck, even here in the US there is a chance of me not being covered if something were to happen!

      1. fair enough earl, but that said, claiming that making money while traveling is easy without also acknowledging some of the risks…thats not painting a whole picture. Would be nice if some travel bloggers were a bit more realistic about risk rather than preoccupied with selling hope. There is risk in travel. Hell, didn’t you get kidnapped in Bangladesh or somethin??? Still enjoy your blog though, much better than NomadicMatt….dude couldn’t write his way out of a paper bag.

        1. Hey John – Okay, I’ll take that advice. My post on Thursday will address the risks involved with travel. On a side note, I do appreciate your comments and am happy to hear that you are enjoying the blog! But I won’t comment on your last line 🙂

        2. Life is an inherent risk. Statistically speaking, your greatest risk is anywhere within a few miles of your home. Breathing the air is dangerous since you don’t know what chemicals can’t be seen, smelled, or tasted. Water has been shown to have traces of pharmaceuticals, among other things, in it. We could go on and on. 🙂

  230. Fantastic lis Earl! This should really help a lot of people get out there and start exploring what’s available as far as opportunities are concerned. You’ve listed a few things here I hadn’t even thought of so I’m really looking forward to researching those options…thanks a ton! 😀

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