Ljubljana, Slovenia

I’m In Love With Ljubljana

Derek Slovenia 100 Comments

Ljubljana, Slovenia
No, Ljubljana is not a woman, but these days, I’ll take whatever I can get. If that means falling in love with the adorable capital city of the small European nation of Slovenia, then so it goes.

Ljubljana, she who mesmerizes and awes visitors with her enormous beauty, is actually quite petite, with a population consisting of a mere 265,000 people or so, and a city center that can be crossed by foot in less than 15 minutes. She definitely keeps in shape as well, evident by her striking figure that follows the curves of the Ljubljanica River. And no matter which part of her your eyes fall upon, whether it be the glowing, and often snow-covered, mountains that form her edges or the atmospheric streets and narrow laneways that wind across her center (sorry, that sounds a lot dirtier than I anticipated), you are bound to find yourself at peace, feeling ever so calm and even slightly giddy at being witness to such a cozy and lovable destination.

Ljubljana Castle

With the Ljubljana Castle perched above the city center, from where one may truly admire this crossroads of North, South, East and West Europe, with its impressive collection of Baroque and Vienna Secession-influenced buildings, the brilliant city of Ljubljana becomes all the more brilliant when one considers that this is the capital city of an independent country that is only 20 years old.

Yet despite its youth and its small frame Ljubljana really does require several days to explore properly. The pace of life is such that an entire afternoon can easily be spent in a small cafe by the river, sipping coffee, eating strudel and chatting with whomever happens to be sitting at the table next to you.

And while there are a sufficient number of museums and sights of interest to keep one busy, including the National Museum of Slovenia, Plecnik’s National Library, the France Preseren monument in Preseren Square, the Triple Bridge, Dragon Bridge, the Butcher’s Bridge, Tivoli Park, the local markets and of course, that Ljubljana Castle, this is the type of city where travelers should forget about creating a detailed daily itinerary. A random wander, without any plan whatsoever, is a much more suitable method of exploration for a city of this size and of this high degree of likeability.

Ljubljana

With Slovenia itself being a country of only 2 million people, the Slovenian people, especially the younger generations, are quite aware of the need to speak other languages and so, as a traveler who most likely doesn’t speak fluent Slovenian, you’ll never have to worry about communication. Almost everyone you meet will not only speak fluent English but will be more than happy to chat and answer any questions you may have. During my visit, it was quite common for me to stop someone in the street to ask for directions and then end up talking about Slovenian history for thirty minutes or end up being invited to a bar for a drink.

The vibe of this city is such that everyone seems so happy, so alive. As the guide of the free walking tour that I went on one day told our group, ‘life in Slovenia is quite good’, and that is exactly the impression that I received from the moment my train arrived. The result was a smile on my face during the entire duration of my stay, even on the day when the temperature dropped to 0 C. There simply can be no other reaction to such a positive place.

And while there are a decent number of tourists roaming the city center every day, Ljubljana makes it quite easy to still enjoy a remarkably local experience. The tiny eateries on Trubarieva Cesta or over by Rimska Cesta, areas that are quite popular with students, offer up local Slovenian specialties all afternoon and evening, along with pints of locally-brewed Union pivo (beer), for very reasonable prices. In fact, every restaurant, cafe and bar I visited proved so locally delightful that I passed many hours inside of each, unwilling to settle for anything less than a completely relaxed dining and/or drinking experience, just as the Slovenians around me preferred as well.

Ljubljanica River, Ljubljana

Preseren Square, Ljubljana

Then, whenever I finally did make my way back outside into the streets, I always felt as if this city was already so familiar to me. Even a short twenty-four hours after my arrival I began to recognize locals around town and they too would recognize me. Ljubljana really is that intimate, and so wonderfully attractive as a result.

Ahh…Ljubljana. I’ve only been gone for three days now but I miss you more than you know. Never before in all my travels have I been welcomed so enthusiastically into strange streets, protected from the cold with such warmth and hospitality and treated as such a good friend despite having never met before. It’s no wonder that I found it so difficult to leave you, to say that final farewell and to pack my bag and move on.

And as I stood in Preseren Square on my last day, leaning up against the walls of the Triple Bridge, watching the happy people pass me by, glancing up at the castle and off into the distance towards the Slovenian Alps, listening to the accordion music joyfully being played near the river, deciding where to have my final coffee, my final beer and my final meal, I also spent much time wondering when I might be fortunate enough to see you again.

I am in love with Ljubljana and I dare anyone to visit this city and not fall victim to her powers of seduction as well.

Since 1999 I've been traveling and living around the world nonstop. Sign up below for personal stories, real advice and useful updates from my adventures. Only good stuff, no nonsense.

Are you ready to earn money and travel?

How to Work on a Cruise Ship and Travel eBooksClick above and get started!

Comments 100

  1. Pingback: My Favorite Travel Destinations In Eastern Europe - Wandering Earl

  2. Pingback: Our Europe Travel Plans: London to Sicily by Train

  3. Jasmina

    Wonderful post. I read some articles and posts… You explain a lot about financial side of travel. I don’t see anywhere any word about love…. to some nice lady? 🙂 How is it about it while travelling all the time? If question is too personal i will understand if u don’t answer. Nice blog! Have a great time!

    1. Earl

      Hey Marusa – Thanks for mentioning this post on your blog! I really appreciate that and at least now you know how one traveler feels about your city 🙂

  4. Pingback: Falling in Love | Ljubljana Fairytale

  5. Lara

    I am a student here in Ljubljana, and I found this very interesting: Me and my roommate were sitting on the Triple bridge on Friday, looking at the tourist (we have lots of them here now, since it’s the ice hockey games) and wondering what are they thinking about the city; later the same day I ran across your blog. We did agree though, because we’re both in love with Ljubljana. I came here to study and felt like home instantly. The summer is also coming, and you kind of MUST see Ljubljana in the summer. It’s the most beautiful place. People sitting at the Kongresni trg or Tivoli, drinking beer, playing guitar, the festivals, the people, the music … Ljubljana in a pocket. We would love to show you around and keep you company, if (when) you decide to come again!
    P.S.:
    The benches on the Triple bridge are now painted in the colors of the countries competing in hockey. Here’s the Slovenian one, just for you 😉
    http://shrani.si/f/E/U5/D6rkMoV/imag0702.jpg

    1. Earl

      Hey Lara – I really do want to visit Slovenia in the summer as I can only imagine how beautiful it will be and how wonderful will be the atmosphere. Just thinking about it makes me want to go right now 🙂 And thanks for the photo link…it seems like Slovenia really knows how to make itself more and more attractive and appealing to visitors and locals alike.

      I shall definitely be in touch when it comes time for me to return to your country!

  6. Jure

    I feel sLOVEnia 🙂

    Thanks for this amazing article. everybody should visit Slovenia it is secret gem of Europe. But shhhhs dont tell anyone 🙂

    1. Earl

      Hey Jure – Haha…that is the problem…how to spread the word and keep it a secret at the same time! Well, I’ll be back for sure and in the end, I just can’t help but tell others how wonderful of a destination it is!

  7. Neil Simpson

    Last year was my wife’s turn to pick our vacation destination. She put up with my beer trail through the streets of Brussels and endless wander to find herring in Amsterdam, so how could I complain. However she told me she wanted to go to Ljubljana. It took me at least three months of practice before I could even say the name of the city right. Everyone I told about our trip looked at me puzzled and always thought it was in Russia or maybe a former USSR enclave. So when the time came we boarded a plane and I finally found time to learn a few key Slovenia phrases. I always make it a point to learn no less than please, thank you, and I’m sorry I don’t speak (fill in the language). Upon arriving at the bus station in Ljubljana I have to admit I was already blown away. It was 10pm and the streets were lively. It’s a young town, in age and spirit. We had booked an apartment for our stay, and even though our bus was nearly 3 hours late we were met at the bus station and then driven to our beautiful apartment in the old town, just under the gaze of the castle.
    The whole city is very walkable. We found so many vendors at the market from various counties throughout Europe. Most spoke English very well and seemed excited to do so. Some of the older generations were a bit more reluctant to do so, but between my wife’s German and my limited French we didn’t have a single problem. (who said high school French class wouldn’t help me in life!) Some of the best meals I’ve had… in my entire life… have been in Ljubljana. The prices can not be beat, the service is always friendly, and the food is all of the best aspects from Italy, Germany, Austria and traditional Slovene. The city truly is a hidden gem right in the middle of Europe.

  8. dani

    …i must admit, it does make my hidden patriotic pleasure tinkle a little bit when i read through all these impressions about my home town and country…
    let me just say this: i’m much at peace that you’ve been able to pick out “the vibe” phenomenon in this town, since we(the locals) have been putting extra effort during the years in creating an atmosphere like that, which wouldn’t be just another tourist friendly cover-up for something else, but a genuine sense of cosiness for everyone to absorbe…
    so here’s a little footnote for all of you inquisitive souls:
    i suggest you take advantage of the fact, that practically everyone in this country(especially the young people) speaks English and almost everyone is keen to present his/her prowess to help people get a true insight into a well hidden european society…combine the two together and you’ll get an extra rare chance of making your travelling experience much more personal than the standard lonelyplanetish hopping around the stunning scenery(which it actually is:)

    cheers people, it really is a wonder planet we’re paying rent for…:)

    1. Earl

      Hey Dani – All I can say is that you have all accomplished that goal of creating such a welcoming atmosphere! I’m not sure I’ve been anywhere else on the planet where I instantly felt as comfortable as I did in Slovenia. And the English skills does make a huge difference. Not only that, but the fact that everyone was so willing to speak English whenever foreigners were around really helped me interact with so many more people than I normally would in most countries.

      Great country indeed!

  9. Pingback: Last Minute Travel Deals 24/7 | The ultimate Slovenia travel guide and resource page

  10. Pingback: The ultimate travel guide for visiting Slovenia | Budget Travel Adventures

  11. T.M.

    Hi Earl 🙂

    I have to say I was quite amazed by your description of Ljubljana. It reminded me of how often we people tend to take all the advantages of living where we live for granted and instead of appreciating all the beautiful our hometowns have to offer, focus on the negative aspects of it.
    Let me tell you a bit about being a young Slovenian student. Most of the times we don’t even realize how sad the mentality widely spread among people mostly born after the declaration of independence (1991) actually is. We are the people who represent the future of Slovenia, but what are our dreams and aspirations? Ask a random student and they will highly likely tell you about how they wish to study and work abroad, how they can’t wait to get out of this small country where they have no realistic option of succeding, where people are brainwashed with small-town mentality and capitalistic egocentrism, diversity is close to nonexistent (and greeted with odd looks), jealousy is a common trait. In fact, there’s a well known Slovenian proverb that goes “Naj sosedu krava crkne” which translates into “May my neighbour’s cow die”.
    Honestly, having written all this, there’s no real point I’m trying to make. Your blog simply inspired my thoughts to wander and I thought I’d tell you a bit about the view from “the other side”.

    But I have to point out this – as little as we Slovenians tend to think and talk about it, we all realize how gorgeous Slovenia in itself is. There’s the seaside, mountains, city-life, forests… The diversity such a small country (with a longitude of only 248km) holds is inexplicably incredible.

    So if you ever wish to visit Slovenia again, please, don’t just stay in Ljubljana. After seeing other, less-touristy beautiful places, you may have an imediate urge to “break up” with our capital and “start a relationship” with another gorgeous town 🙂

    Best wishes to you and greetings from Novo mesto!

    1. Earl

      Hey T.M. – Thanks so much for the comment and it’s interesting because I did in fact meet a university student in Ljubljana who basically said the exact same thing as you did. And it makes sense, with such a small country, there are going to be limited opportunities, especially when everyone can attend university for free (which I believe is the case there). Naturally, people are going to therefore want to leave in order follow their dreams and get away from the ‘small town’ mentality, like you said.

      But I must say, for a traveler, Slovenia is about as wonderful a destination as there is and I’m happy to hear that no matter what, Slovenians do appreciate the beauty that surrounds you 🙂

  12. Pingback: Tears for Ljubljana | Hecktic Travels

  13. Pingback: A geek with a hat » I kicked myself in the balls

  14. Pingback: A geek with a hat » TEDxYouth Ljubljana report

  15. Dalene

    Hey Earl – we just rolled into Ljubljana on our Eurail tour tonight, so I came by this post for a little refresher on the city before we went out to explore and get dinner.

    No word of a lie, I actually cried on the streets. I totally get it. After 2.5 years of being on the road, no other place has ever done this to me.

    Perhaps we can be neighbors here someday… 🙂

    1. Earl

      Hey Dalene – I would love to be neighbors in Ljubljana someday 🙂 I’m not joking when I say that I could live there for a while and it seems you’re starting to feel the same. Enjoy yourselves over there and if it gets too cold for you, pay a visit to Spa Franci where, for $20, you can have a 3-hour pass to a beautiful, family-owned sauna and spa that is bound to warm you guys up! It was my savior in terms of dealing with the weather.

  16. JK

    Another Slovenian here 😉 it’s great to read this beautiful words about my hometown 🙂 thank you for sharing your information with the world… hope you come back, because we’d love to read more about your experience in Ljubljana (and other places in Slovenia are a must see also)

    1. Earl

      Hey JK – I know I’ll be back to Slovenia! There is too much left for me to see and now, there are too many new people to meet as well 🙂

  17. Pingback: Soulful Spirit Of Ljubljana Volume 2 « My Mixed Reviews

  18. Tadeja

    hello, I’m also from Slovenia and your blog is becoming quite popular – we are indeed a small country 😉

    Love your way of writting, you truly have a gift! I also liked your perception of Ljubljana 🙂

    anyway – if you come back, don’t hesitate to contact me – me and my friends would love to present you some great slovene wines and cheses and prosciutto … you have my e-mail 😉

    have fun,

    tadeja

    1. Earl

      Hey Tadeja – I see that many Slovenians are finding my blog and I couldn’t be happier about it 🙂 And I’m quite certain that I will make it back at some point soon, especially with your offer to show me some Slovenian specialties!

  19. Urša Čehovin

    It’s really nice to read articles about my home town, especially the ones that are so enthusiastic and well written. I live in Ljubljana … and I must agree with you – Ljubljana is awesome!
    Hug from here! 🙂

    1. Earl

      Hey Ursa – I love that some people from Ljubljana have found my posts! And I am only enthusiastic about your home town because of all the wonderful people I met during my stay there. Hopefully next time we’ll meet as well 🙂

  20. Bella

    Hey! Wow, I did not know you were that crazy in love with Ljubljana. It was beautiful and the stay at the hostel certainly made the experience even better. I honestly felt like I was at home with you guys that I hated to leave. The pictures came out great by the way. It was a lovely post D.

    1. Earl

      Hey Bella – Well, I did end up staying a lot longer than I planned…and you’re right, that hostel did make it even better as there’s nothing like having a friendly, comfortable place to return to every night!

  21. Leah Downs

    (@barebrancheshvn). Holy Cow the city has changed in a decade!!! So encouraging to see. While some of your photos look familiar, there’s been lots of growth…it may also look more colorful because we were there over a VERY cold snowy (beautiful) Christmas in frigid temperatures in which we were layered in coats/scarves/earmuffs and bracing the wind! do you mind me asking if all the photos are your own, or if you supplement with other footage to describe a site you visited but missed a good shot from? (forgive me if that sounds rude, not sure proper travel blog etiquette/questions!). Our pictures given the season and gray skies for example, are not nearly as lovely as these.

    1. Earl

      Hey Leah – I’m quite happy that it didn’t snow in the city when I was there…not sure I could have handled that at all 🙂

      And the photos of my travels are all my own (except for a handful in some of my posts from last year). Even though they aren’t perfect and I do certainly miss some good angles, I feel it’s better to supplement my stories with my own photos instead of relying on others who may have taken better shots.

    1. Earl

      Hey Gaja – I did not make it to Piran unfortunately as this trip is a little faster than I normally travel. But I certainly will take your recommendation and add to my list for the next time I make it to your wonderful country 🙂

      1. Nina

        I definitely suggest you visit Piran next time you’re in Slovenia. It’s a tiny coastal village but I think I’d choose it over Ljubljana any day. 🙂

        1. Earl

          Hey Nina – It’s funny you mention Piran as I was just looking at some photos of that place yesterday. And I was thinking to myself that I need to get there at some point! I’m sure I will 🙂

  22. Pingback: V kateri kraj ste zaljubljeni? | Popotniški dnevnik družine na potepu po svetu

  23. Pingback: Lake Bled, Slovenia: Not Just Another Lake | Wandering Earl

  24. Lily Leung

    Hi Earl,

    I adored Ljubljana too. It was charming (but not too charming) and it was creepy at the same time with those odd sculptures – like the four dragons on the bridge, melting Adam & Eve and the man with his ribs showing. Love your photos of the town centre from above 🙂

    – Lily

    1. Earl

      Hey Lily – It was a bit creepy with those bridges and statues, especially considering one was called the Butcher’s Bridge! But I loved how every bridge, every statue, every building almost, had such a unique story behind it. It really made this city come alive for me.

  25. Scott

    Right there with you, man. I read about Ljubljana for a couple years and when I finally got there last September for the weekend, it was all I hoped it would be and more. As you have mentioned, it truly seems like the perfect size to get to know quickly and feel a part of the town.

    1. Earl

      Hey Scott – Glad you were able to get down there for a visit. It really does take just a couple of hours to feel as if you’ve been in Ljubljana for weeks already!

  26. Erik

    I keep hearing this theme over and over again. Guess Ljubljana’s not so undiscovered anymore! Thanks for sharing. Really enjoying following along.

    1. Earl

      Hey Erik – You’re right, this city can no longer be classified as a ‘hidden gem’ or anything along those lines. More and more people seem to be talking about it as a great destination all the time, and rightly so!

  27. Sage

    Couldn’t agree more Earl. Well Described. As a Ljubljana thespian seated at a tiny pub at the base of the Castle tram once told me after watching a production of Romeo and Juliet together:
    “Enjoy yourself here in Ljubljana… But we wouldn’t mind if you did not tell anyone about this place”… Classic!
    ~Sage

    1. Earl

      Hey Sage – Ha! That is classic for sure. I think the word is leaking out though and that person might be quite disappointed these days!

  28. Tyler Fitzpatrick

    You forgot to tell the story about our trip to the sauna 😛
    I’m loving your blog, especially this post. Enjoy Bosnia!

    1. Earl

      Hey Tyler – Good to hear from you! Don’t worry, that story is definitely coming up in a future post in which I describe the torture of getting soaked in the rain and snow that day 🙂

      I hope all is well with you and I appreciate you checking out the site!

  29. Caz Makepeace

    I’ve never really had an interest to go to Slovenia, but after this posts and Jeremy’s ones on them I am really keen. It looks beautiful. Are you thinking of going back there to live for awhile?

    1. Earl

      Hey Caz – Spending more time in Ljubljana is definitely on my mind at the moment. I’d probably wait until the warmer months but it is a real possibility. I personally enjoy small, cozy cities that make it so easy to become integrated into the daily life and I haven’t discovered too many of these kind of places around the world!

    1. Earl

      Hey Nateniale – You really should try to include Ljubljana! Everyone I’ve met so far on this trip who has been to that city has also mentioned it as one of their favorite destinations in Europe.

    1. Earl

      Hey Clare – I think the perception is changing and Slovenia is on more and more people’s radar. It’s the perfect country to add to any itinerary in this region as it’s well connected to many parts of Croatia. Hopefully the trend will continue and tourism will increase!

  30. charmine

    Earl, I agree with you,Slovenia is a loveable little nation and folks there are helpful and friendly.I felt welcome there and they do look very happy.Did you get to see the 3d documentary on Slovenia at the castle? Loved the write up.

    1. Earl

      Hey Charmine – I must have missed that documentary at the castle somehow. Probably because I went up there towards the end of an exhausting day and sort of rushed through. But I could see myself spending a few months in Ljubljana at some point so perhaps I’ll be back again!

  31. Marko

    Nice post! Being a Slovenian it is always nice to read about fellow travellers liking our little country.
    I can only agree that Ljubljana is a very pleasant place to spend a few days, but as others have already mentioned, there is much more this little gem of a country has to offer. I am pretty sure you would love other parts as well. In my opinion nature is the thing that is really worth seeing in Slovenia (caves, lakes, water sports, hiking and much more).

    I hope you will also like other countries of the former Yugoslavia that I suppose you are visiting next. Enjoy your trip and come back again. 😉

    1. Earl

      Hey Marko! Thank you for adding your input and of course, I agree that Slovenia has plenty of more to offer. I’ll be writing about the other regions I visited in an upcoming post as well with a focus on the lakes and caves, all of which were beyond impressive! For a little country, one could spend a long, long time in Slovenia and not run out of places to visit and activities to participate in 🙂

    1. Earl

      Hey Lauren – That seems to be quite common occurrence here…I met many travelers who planned to only stay a day or two but kept on extending their stay because they didn’t want to leave!

  32. John Peden

    This was somewhere I was considering before my girlfriend demanded that we relocate to a warm (year-round) climate. Unfortunately, we’re now in Gran Canaria instead of wandering the streets of Ljubljana but I suppose you live and learn.

    Slovenia definitely struck me as somewhere that would be nice to call home for at least a few months of the year. Mountains to the North for winter sports, nice beaches (although stony I think) to the South when the weather gets warmer and a vibrant city to base yourself in for the rest of the time.

    1. Earl

      Hey John – I’m sure you’ll get there eventually. And I had the same feeling as you…that this country would be a perfect place to spend several months. The best part is that those mountains and beaches and lakes and caves are all within such a relatively short distance from the capital!

    1. Earl

      Hey Tim – I did get to the Metelkova district, once during the day and once at night. It was an interesting part of the city and a great place to just sit down and enjoy a coffee or beer, as you obviously know!

  33. Jodi

    Well, unlike Jer I’ve never been but I HAVE met a bunch of Slovenians on my travels and each of them were wonderful to spend time with. It certainly made me want to visit, and this post merely reinforces that desire. Looks like I’ll have to bump it up the list – thanks for sharing!

    1. Earl

      Hey Jodi – The Slovenians you’ll meet in Slovenia will make you want to live there for a while! They really know how to enjoy and make the most out of life and they seem to really appreciate everything they have as well. It’s one of the most positive places I’ve ever visited.

  34. Jeremy Branham

    You don’t have to convince me! I’ve been a fan of Ljubljana and Slovenia for years. I worked with the tourist board there on promoting the country and writing some posts about it. It is a small country but there is so much to see and do. It has something for everyone and Ljubljana is a fantastic capital!

    1. Earl

      Hey Jeremy – Clearly your work must have paid off as I was impressed with how many travelers were passing through when I was there, especially considering the relatively cold temperatures at the time! There really is a ton of stuff to do, something that at first might be difficult to believe when you look at the country on a map. But once you actually arrive, you don’t know what to do first and you realize that even a month won’t be enough time to see everything!

  35. KC

    Earl, as you know, we just started following you, but you’ve already opened our eyes and teased our senses. Added to the list: schnitzel in Vienna and Ljubljana. Didn’t notice if you have, but can you post the Eurail pass info.
    Peace.

    1. Earl

      Hey KC – Thanks for the comment and glad that you’ve added a few places to your list 🙂 And I will be writing a complete post in the very near future that will have all of the details about the Eurail Pass…should be up within in the next few weeks!

  36. Kirsten Lodge

    Hi Earl ~ I sped through Slovenia on the train to get to Croatia but stopped at Ljubljana and Lake Bled. In hindsight I wished I had spent more time there. When my mate and I arrived in Ljubljana the hostel owner offered to drive us somewhere nice for dinner. We were dubious but he took us to the most stunning cafe on the river. It was cheap and we were treated like royalty. Ljubljana is still one of my favourite cities. Love your blog Earl. Kirsten

    1. Earl

      Hey Kirsten – That story sounds about right for this city! Travelers are met with genuine friendliness and hospitality everywhere they go. And it seems that most people only plan a short stop in this country but soon find themselves wishing they had planned things differently and stayed much longer!

      1. Earl

        Hey Steve – As far as hostels go, I can highly recommend the Villa Veselova hostel in Ljubljana. Such a great, friendly place just five minutes walk from the city center.

  37. Steve C

    Earl, great post! I love those kind of places. I’m not a big beer drinker, but when it’s 0 C outside, it’s nice to be inside where it’s warm w/ a nice brew.
    I got a kick out of Andrea’s post above compared to your take on Ljubljana. You’re both right with your impressions as we’re all different in the things we like and dislike. I know that I’ve been in places where others have loved and I’ve had the opposite experience, and vice versa. I remember an old friend who always said he had the best jokes and saw the best movies. Neither were ever the best!
    As I’ve been following you with your train pass, I’ve noted that you’ve been on the go a bit faster than you might otherwise travel. I’m a slow traveler and don’t like it when I have a prearranged ticket hanging over my head. However, my first trip to Europe was done with a 3 month Student Eu-rail Pass and it served me very well. But, as that was my first backpack trip overseas, it was a great learning experience and the pass helped make it a lot easier.
    Ljubljana has now been added to my must visit list. Go find some more!

    1. Earl

      Hey Steve – You are right, I normally do travel much slower than I am doing on this trip. But that’s alright, it’s just a different style and I’m enjoying myself nonetheless! And I still have the flexibility to determine exactly where I end up, but having an actual end date is something that I’m not used to 🙂

      And I’m glad that Ljubljana is on your list now. It certainly deserves to be there as you’ll hopefully discover soon enough!

  38. Linda, I'd rather be traveling

    You are an incredible story teller….loved this style of writing from you today.Guess we will surely add this to our travel…..be safe…..

    1. Earl

      Thank you Linda! And Slovenia should definitely be added to your list of potential travel destinations…I have no doubt you’ll love it as much as I did!!

  39. jeff

    Hi Earl,

    I know this obviously varies by country and even region, but have you ever blogged about what a person can live on monetarily per day in all of your travels?

    1. Earl

      Hey Jeff – I’ve written several posts about travel costs, many of which can be found in my “Travel Costs” category. The latest post I wrote in that category – Do Budget Travelers Travel In Comfort or Poverty? – discusses what it’s like to travel on a budget of $1000 or less per month.

      Basically, I don’t break it down per day, but rather by month. It is my belief that if you were to spend 1 month in every single country in the world, when all was said and done, you would have spent an average of $1000 per month overall, as long as you stuck to ‘budget travel’ the entire time.

  40. Andrea

    I must admit Ljubljana didn’t do it for me. Not sure why but I was a little underwhelmed. I did love the rest of Slovenia though, in particular Lake Bohinj.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *